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Western wildfires: California blaze crosses into Nevada

By The Associated Press
Posted 11:41AM on Thursday 22nd July 2021 ( 2 months ago )

GARDNERVILLE, Nev. (AP) — A Northern California wildfire crossed into Nevada, prompting new evacuations, but better weather has been helping crews battling the nation’s largest blaze in southern Oregon.

The Tamarack Fire south of Lake Tahoe had burned more than 68 square miles (176 square kilometers) of timber and head-high chaparral in national forest land. It erupted July 4 and was one of nearly two dozen blazes sparked by lightning strikes.

More than 1,200 firefighters were battling the Alpine County blaze, which has destroyed at least 10 buildings, forced evacuations in several communities and had closed parts of U.S. 395 in Nevada and California. Fire officials expected active or extreme fire behavior on Thursday, which could see 14 mph (23 kph) winds and temperatures approaching 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 Celsius).

A request for voluntary evacuations was also issued for portions of Douglas County, Nevada. An evacuation center was set up at a community center in Gardnerville, Nevada.

Evacuee Morgana-Le-Fae Veatch said she already had boxed up most of her belongings because she is starting community college next week but her parents lost their house in a 1987 blaze.

“So this has been really, really stressing to them," she said.

To the northwest, the summer fun of boating and bathing came to an abrupt end for vacationers at Lake Almanor as the Dixie Fire spread up the west flank of the Sierra Nevada, expanding to more than 162 square miles. The west shore of the resort lake and many other small communities were under evacuation orders.

Meanwhile, Oregon on Wednesday banned all campfires on state-managed lands and in state campgrounds east of Interstate 5, the major highway that is commonly considered the dividing line between the wet western part of the state and the dry eastern half.

The nation’s largest wildfire, Oregon’s Bootleg Fire, grew to 624 square miles (1,616 square kilometers) — just over half the size of Rhode Island.

However, authorities said lower winds and temperatures allowed crews to improve fire lines. The fire also was approaching an area burned by a previous fire on its active southeastern flank, raising hopes that lack of fuel could reduce its spread.

The Oregon fire, which was sparked by lightning, has ravaged the sparsely populated southern part of the state and had been expanding by up to 4 miles (6 kilometers) a day, pushed by strong winds and critically dry weather that turned trees and undergrowth into a tinderbox.

Fire crews have had to retreat from the flames for 10 consecutive days as fireballs jump from treetop to treetop, trees explode, embers fly ahead of the fire to start new blazes and, in some cases, the inferno’s heat creates its own weather of shifting winds and dry lightning. Monstrous clouds of smoke and ash have risen up to 6 miles (10 kilometers) into the sky and are visible for more than 100 air miles (161 kilometers).

The blaze, which is being fought by more than 2,200 people, is more than one-third contained.

At least 2,000 homes were ordered evacuated at some point during the fire and an additional 5,000 were threatened. At least 70 homes and more than 100 outbuildings have burned, but no one is known to have died.

Extremely dry conditions and recent heat waves tied to climate change have made wildfires harder to fight. Climate change has made the West much warmer and drier in the past 30 years and will continue to make weather more extreme and wildfires more frequent and destructive.

Manhattan is seen from Yankee Stadium through a haze of smoke before a baseball game between the Philadelphia Phillies and the New York Yankees, Wednesday, July 21, 2021, in New York. Wildfires in the American West, including one burning in Oregon that's currently the largest in the U.S., are creating hazy skies as far away as New York as the massive infernos spew smoke and ash into the air in columns up to six miles high. (AP Photo/Adam Hunger)
Spot fires smolder near trees damaged by the Bootleg Fire on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 in Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
This satellite image provided by Satellite image ©2021 Maxar Technologies shows the wildfires in Northern California and Oregon on Wednesday, July 21, 2021. The Oregon fire, which was sparked by lightning, has ravaged the sparsely populated southern part of the state and had been expanding by up to 4 miles (6 kilometers) a day, pushed by strong winds and critically dry weather that turned trees and undergrowth into a tinderbox. (Satellite image ©2021 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This satellite image provided by Satellite image ©2021 Maxar Technologies the Bootleg Fire in Oregon on Wednesday, July 21, 2021. The Oregon fire, which was sparked by lightning, has ravaged the sparsely populated southern part of the state and had been expanding by up to 4 miles (6 kilometers) a day, pushed by strong winds and critically dry weather that turned trees and undergrowth into a tinderbox. (Satellite image ©2021 Maxar Technologies via AP)
A couple walks along the beach in Cherry Grove, S.C., early Thursday, July 22, 2021. Smoke from wildfires in the western U.S. and Canada is blanketing much of the continent, including thousands of miles away on the East Coast. And experts say the phenomenon is becoming more common as human-caused global warming stokes bigger and more intense blazes. (Mark Rogers/The Sanford Herald via AP)
A couple walks along the beach in Cherry Grove, S.C., early Thursday, July 22, 2021. Smoke from wildfires in the western U.S. and Canada is blanketing much of the continent, including thousands of miles away on the East Coast. And experts say the phenomenon is becoming more common as human-caused global warming stokes bigger and more intense blazes. (Mark Rogers/The Sanford Herald via AP)
Melted metal is seen near a home destroyed by the Bootleg Fire on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 near Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
A firetruck responding to the Bootleg Fire is driven past a hand-painted sign thanking firefighters on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 in Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
A damaged and abandoned excavator is seen in an area burned by the Bootleg Fire on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 in Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
A fire-damaged sign hangs near trees burned by the Bootleg Fire on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 in Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
Smoke rises from the Bootleg Fire on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 near Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
A fire-damaged mile marker sign hangs near trees burned by the Bootleg Fire on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 in Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
A home destroyed by the Bootleg Fire is seen here on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 near Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
A burned car damaged by the Bootleg Fire is seen here along a mountain road on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 near Bly, Ore. (AP Photo/Nathan Howard)
A clearing sky appears over Yankee Stadium after a rain storm moved through clearing a haze of smoke before a baseball game between the Philadelphia Phillies and the New York Yankees, Wednesday, July 21, 2021, in New York. Wildfires in the American West, including one burning in Oregon that's currently the largest in the U.S., are creating hazy skies as far away as New York as the massive infernos spew smoke and ash into the air in columns up to six miles high. (AP Photo/Adam Hunger)

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