cloudy.png
Tuesday January 31st, 2023 5:59PM

Perdue in chancellor debut: Georgia universities to aim high

By The Associated Press

ATLANTA (AP) — Sonny Perdue stopped by the Georgia capitol on Friday on the morning of his 50th wedding anniversary to pick up some jewelry – his medallion of office — as he was officially invested as chancellor of the University System of Georgia while declaring his goal that the system be recognized as the best in the nation.

“Georgia’s public colleges and universities open the door of opportunity for everyone, and they provide great value to the state of Georgia,” Perdue said in a speech, citing distinguished graduates of even less well-known institutions like Dalton State College and Columbus State University.

Gov. Brian Kemp, House Speaker David Ralston and others saluted the former two-term governor and U.S. agriculture secretary at the ceremony, which came after regents chose Perdue in March to lead the 340,000-student system.

Kemp, university system leaders and others lavished praise on Perdue with tributes to his prior career as a state senator and Georgia’s first modern-day Republican governor.

“After all that he has done, the man has nothing left to prove, but yet here he is,” said former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Harold Melton, who was a lawyer for Perdue and appointed by Perdue to the state high court.

Perdue, 75, took over in April only after Kemp realigned the 19-member Board of Regents to remove several regents who had stalled the appointment for months. Some students and faculty opposed Perdue as unqualified for the position.

He’s being paid $523,900 a year to oversee 26 universities and colleges that spend a collective $9.2 billion, including $3.12 billion in state tax money and $3.13 billion in student tuition.

The new chancellor calls his position “maybe the most impactful job I’ve ever had.” He has signaled continuity with key policies pushed by former Chancellor Steve Wrigley, including guiding students to progress toward degrees and graduate on time, as well as holding down tuition.

Perdue presided over years of belt-tightening as governor, but takes the reins of the sprawling university system at a time when state budgets are fat. Lawmakers sent the universities $230 million to roll back student costs by an average of 7.6% this fall, eliminating a special institutional fee that schools had been charging atop tuition for more than a decade.

“The Board of Regents is committed to keeping costs low as the best way for them to complete a degree," Perdue said. “Inexpensive does not mean inferior. It means value.”

But Perdue faces the challenge of declining enrollment at a number of smaller regional institutions. He announced earlier this week that 24 of the 26 institutions will again waive SAT and ACT test scores for students being admitted in 2023. The University of Georgia and Georgia Tech will be the only exceptions.

A native of the middle Georgia town of Bonaire, Perdue earned a doctorate in veterinary medicine from the University of Georgia. Georgia Tech President Angel Cabrera gave Perdue a tie that includes colors of all the system's schools, telling Perdue he will “no longer have to worry about playing favorites when you get dressed for work.”

Perdue's biggest new initiative so far has been seeking more data to guide decisions for the sprawling system. He said that's key to spurring further improvements.

“Remember, I may not look like it, but I’m a facts-based data geek," Perdue said.

He also said publishing more data will boost public confidence in the system at a time when some question the politics of universities and some high school students are choosing to go straight into a job market starved for workers.

“We want to be trustworthy," Perdue said." We want to earn the public’s trust, and that means being willing to hold ourselves accountable.”

Perdue also says he wants to do more to keep students from leaving the state to seek an education.

“Now I feel like I’ve become a possessive grandpa," he said. "I don’t want any of them to think they need to leave the state to get a good education.”

___

Follow Jeff Amy on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jeffamy.

  • Associated Categories: Associated Press (AP), AP Online Headlines - Washington, AP Online Supreme Court News, AP Business, AP Online - Georgia News, AP Online Headlines - Georgia News
© Copyright 2023 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
Suspect in Memphis shooting rampage granted public defender
A Tennessee man accused of killing four people and wounding three others in a livestreamed shooting rampage that paralyzed Memphis and led to a city-wide manhunt was granted a public defender during Friday morning court appearance and will remain jailed on a first-degree murder charge
12:42PM ( 13 minutes ago )
Ga State welcomes Power Five team to the former Turner Field
When Georgia State moved into the ballpark formerly known as Turner Field, it was hoping for a day such as this
12:42PM ( 14 minutes ago )
GOP nominee from Oregon cleared of campaign cash violation
Alek Skarlatos, a Republican nominee for Congress in Oregon, was cleared this week of violating campaign finance law
12:31PM ( 24 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
EU nations struggle to find joint approach on energy prices
European Union nations are struggling to find full consensus on ways to shield the population from increasing energy prices that threaten to plunge millions into cold and poverty over the winter as Russia chokes off natural gas supplies
12:05PM ( 50 minutes ago )
Board puts abortion rights question on Michigan fall ballot
A Michigan election board has placed an abortion-rights proposal on the fall ballot
12:03PM ( 53 minutes ago )
Biden at Ohio groundbreaking: Dems reviving manufacturing
President Joe Biden is putting the spotlight on a rare bipartisan down payment on U.S. manufacturing
11:57AM ( 58 minutes ago )
AP Online Headlines - Washington
Trump documents probe: US ready to appeal judge's hold
The Justice Department is preparing to appeal a judge’s decision to name an independent arbiter to review records seized by the FBI from former President Donald Trump’s Florida home
8:01PM ( 16 hours ago )
Exceptions split Republicans in South Carolina abortion ban
A proposed ban on all abortions in South Carolina hangs in the balance as Republicans in the South Carolina Senate can't agree on whether exceptions for rape or incest should be included in the bill
11:50AM ( 1 day ago )
Judge rules against required coverage of HIV prevention drug
A federal judge in Texas has ruled that required coverage of an HIV prevention drug under the Affordable Care Act violates a Texas employer’s religious beliefs and undercut the broader system that determines which preventive drugs are covered in the U.S. The ruling was handed down Wednesday by Fort Worth-based U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor, who ruled in 2018 that the entire ACA is invalid
6:55PM ( 1 day ago )
AP Online Supreme Court News
'A servant queen': World pays tribute to Queen Elizabeth II
Across the globe, the death of Queen Elizabeth II has prompted reflections on the historic sweep of her reign and how she succeeded in presiding over the end of Britain’s colonial empire and embracing the independence of her former dominions
12:11PM ( 44 minutes ago )
Ukraine claws back some territory; nuclear plant in peril
Ukrainian forces are claiming new success in their counteroffensive against Russian forces in the country’s east, taking control of a sizeable village and pushing toward an important transport junction
12:01PM ( 54 minutes ago )
Online bets surge as NFL kicks off, indicating a busy year
The level of online betting activity on Thursday night’s NFL kickoff game surged 77% over the level from last year’s opener
11:51AM ( 1 hour ago )
AP Business
Saints' Kamara mum on case, talks up revamped offense
Saints star running back Alvin Kamara isn't ready to discuss his felony battery case but is open to explaining his positive outlook on New Orleans' healthier and revamped offense
8:30PM ( 16 hours ago )
As deadline looms, railroads say strike would cost $2B a day
The major freight railroads say in a new report designed to put pressure on unions and Congress that a strike would cost the economy more than $2 billion a day and disrupt deliveries of all kinds of goods and passenger traffic nationwide if it happens after a key deadline passes next Friday without a contract agreement
4:17PM ( 20 hours ago )
Saints begin Dennis Allen era vs rebuilding Falcons
The New Orleans Saints are beginning a new era
3:44PM ( 21 hours ago )
AP Online - Georgia News
AP Online Headlines - Georgia News
Suspect in Memphis shooting rampage granted public defender
A Tennessee man accused of killing four people and wounding three others in a livestreamed shooting rampage that paralyzed Memphis and led to a city-wide manhunt was granted a public defender during Friday morning court appearance and will remain jailed on a first-degree murder charge
12:42PM ( 13 minutes ago )
Ga State welcomes Power Five team to the former Turner Field
When Georgia State moved into the ballpark formerly known as Turner Field, it was hoping for a day such as this
12:42PM ( 14 minutes ago )
GOP nominee from Oregon cleared of campaign cash violation
Alek Skarlatos, a Republican nominee for Congress in Oregon, was cleared this week of violating campaign finance law
12:31PM ( 25 minutes ago )
Colombia, Venezuela border to reopen to cargo traffic
The presidents of Colombia and Venezuela say the years-long closure of their countries’ shared border to cargo transport will end Sept. 26
12:30PM ( 25 minutes ago )
Proud Boys Hawaii leader, friend plead guilty in Jan. 6 riot
The founder of the Hawaii Proud Boys chapter and a Texas man who stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, and posed for a picture in front a door on which one of them had written “Murder the Media” each pleaded guilty Friday to a felony charge in connection with the riot
12:28PM ( 27 minutes ago )