clearn.png
Thursday August 11th, 2022 11:56PM

'It's just hell there': Russia still pounds eastern Ukraine

By The Associated Press
Related Articles
  Contact Editor

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia’s military kept grinding down Ukraine’s defenses Monday, with combat in eastern areas said to be entering a “decisive” phase, as the war’s consequences for food and fuel supplies increasingly weighed on minds around the globe.

In Ukraine’s eastern Luhansk region, which in recent weeks has become the focal point of Moscow’s attempt to impose its will on its neighbor, battles raged for the control of multiple villages, the local governor said.

Ukrainian Deputy Defense Minister Hanna Maliar said the Kremlin had ordered the Russian military to overrun the entire Luhansk region by next Sunday. Currently, Moscow’s forces control about 95% of the region.

Maliar said in televised remarks that “without exaggeration, decisive battles are taking place” in the area, where Ukrainian forces are desperately trying to avoid being encircled.

“We must understand that the enemy has an advantage both in terms of personnel and weapons, so the situation is extremely difficult. And at this very minute these decisive battles are ongoing at the maximum intensity,” Maliar added.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy repeated his plea for more Western weapons to fend off the Russian onslaught.

“We need your support, we need weaponry, weapons that will have better capabilities than the Russian weapons,” he told a forum in Milan that was organized by the ISPI geo-political think tank. He spoke by video link.

Zelenskyy added: “This is a matter of life or death.”

The villages where combat is fierce are around Sievierodonetsk and Lysychansk, two cities in the Luhansk region yet to be captured by the Russians, according to Luhansk governor Serhiy Haidai.

Russian shelling and airstrikes on the industrial outskirts of Sievierodonetsk have intensified, he said.

Haidai told The Associated Press on Monday that the situation in Sievierodonetsk was “very difficult,” with the Ukrainian forces maintaining control over just one area — the Azot chemical plant, where a number of Ukrainian fighters, along with about 500 civilians, are taking shelter.

The Russians keep deploying additional troops and equipment in the area, he said.

“It’s just hell there. Everything is engulfed in fire, the shelling doesn’t stop even for an hour,” Haidai said in written comments.

Only a fraction of 100,000 people who used to live in Sievierodonetsk before the war remain in the city, with no electricity, communications, food or medicine.

Even so, Haidai said, the staunch Ukrainian resistance is preventing Moscow from deploying its resources to other parts of the country.

The British defense ministry noted that the war is not going all Russia’s way, despite its superior military assets.

Russian ground troops are “exhausted,” the defense ministry said in an intelligence report Monday. It blamed poor air support for Russia's difficulty in making swifter progress on the ground.

Across the world, drivers are rethinking their habits and personal finances amid surging prices for gasoline and diesel, fueled by Russia’s war in Ukraine as well as the global rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic. Energy prices are a key driver of inflation that is rising worldwide and making the cost of living more expensive.

The European Union’s top diplomats gathered in Luxembourg on Monday for talks focused on Ukraine and food security.

EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell called on Russia to lift its blockades of Ukrainian ports to help deliver the millions of tons of grain waiting to be exported.

“I hope — more than hope, I am sure — that the United Nations will at the end reach an agreement,” Borrell said. “It is unconceivable, one cannot imagine that millions of tons of wheat remain blocked in Ukraine while in the rest of the world, people are suffering (from) hunger. This is a real war crime ... You cannot use the hunger of people as a weapon of war.”

Financial help for children displaced by the war in Ukraine was due to come from an unlikely quarter later Monday, when Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov looked to auction off his Nobel Peace Prize medal in New York.

Muratov was awarded the gold medal in October 2021. He helped found the independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta and was the publication’s editor-in-chief when it shut down in March amid the Kremlin’s clampdown on journalists and public dissent in the wake of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Muratov had already announced he was donating to charity the $500,000 cash award that came with the prize. The proceeds will go directly to UNICEF in its efforts to help children displaced by the war in Ukraine.

In other developments Monday:

— Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said two American veterans who were captured by Russian forces while fighting alongside the Ukrainian military should be “held responsible for the crimes they have committed.” Speaking in an interview with NBC News, Peskov said the Americans — Alex Drueke and Andy Huynh, both from Alabama — are not protected by the Geneva Conventions as prisoners of war.

— A Russian governor said Ukrainian shelling of a Russian village near the border with Ukraine wounded one person. A power station was hit, leaving parts of the village without electricity, according to Alexander Bogomaz, governor of the Bryansk region.

— The Russian military said it hit an airfield in Ukraine’s southern Odesa region with a missile, destroying two Bayraktar drones and a drone control station. Defense Ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov said a high-precision Oniks missile hit an Artsyz airfield on the Odesa region. Earlier on Monday, the Ukrainian military said its air defense system deterred two airstrikes on the Odesa region, destroying the incoming missiles. The contradicting reports couldn't be immediately reconciled.

— The head of the Russia-backed authorities in the Crimean Peninsula, annexed from Ukraine in 2014, said that Ukrainian forces had struck three platforms operating in a Black Sea gas field. Sergei Aksyonov told Russian TV that 12 people had been on the platform which was hardest hit. Five of them were rescued with injuries and the others were missing. He added that there were no confirmed cases of people being killed or injured on the other two platforms, and that Crimea wouldn't face energy shortages.

— The death toll has risen to three following a Russian strike on an oil storage facility on Saturday, according to Ukrainian regional governor Valentyn Reznichenko. He said Monday that emergency crews were still trying to extinguish the flames at the facility in the Dnipropetrovsk region, about 200 miles (320 kilometers) southeast of Kyiv.

___

AP reporters around the world contributed to this story.

___

Follow the AP’s coverage of the war at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

  • Associated Categories: Associated Press (AP), AP National News, AP Online National News, Top General short headlines, AP World News, AP Business, AP Business - Industries, AP Business - Utilities
© Copyright 2022 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
'It's just hell there': Russia still pounds eastern Ukraine
Russia’s military machine is persevering in its ferocious effort to grind down Ukraine’s defenses
6:22AM ( 13 minutes ago )
Last-ditch talks aim to avert disruptive UK rail strike
Unions and train companies in Britain are set to hold last-minute talks Monday aimed at averting the country’s biggest rail strikes for decades
6:07AM ( 28 minutes ago )
Belgium returns Congo independence hero's tooth to family
Belgian authorities have returned a gold-capped tooth of the slain Congolese independence hero Patrice Lumumba
6:00AM ( 35 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
Asian markets mostly lower; bitcoin steady at $20,000
Asian markets are mostly lower in cautious trading, while the price of bitcoin remained near $20,000
3:24AM ( 3 hours ago )
William at 40: A milestone birthday in a life under scrutiny
The world watched as Prince William grew from a towheaded schoolboy to a dashing air-sea rescue pilot to a balding father of three
2:51AM ( 3 hours ago )
Food, water concerns as floods continue to batter Bangladesh
Floods in Bangladesh have left millions struggling to access safe drinking water and food across the country’s vast northeastern and northern regions
2:20AM ( 4 hours ago )
AP National News
Ex-rebel wins runoff to be Colombia's 1st leftist president
Former rebel Gustavo Petro has narrowly won a runoff election in Colombia over a political outsider millionaire, ushering in a new era of politics by becoming the country’s first leftist president
11:00PM ( 7 hours ago )
Ex-rebel in slim win to be Colombia's 1st leftist president
Former rebel Gustavo Petro has narrowly won a runoff election in Colombia over a political outsider millionaire, ushering in a new era of politics by becoming the country’s first leftist president
9:59PM ( 8 hours ago )
Juneteenth celebrations emphasize ending racial disparities
A year after Juneteenth became a federal holiday in the U.S., people gathered this weekend at events filled with music, food and fireworks
9:23PM ( 9 hours ago )
AP Online National News
Black Americans living abroad reflect on Juneteenth holiday
As the United States marks only the second federally recognized Juneteenth, Black Americans living overseas have embraced the holiday as a day of reflection and an opportunity to educate people in their host countries on Black history
9:41PM ( 8 hours ago )
Duterte's daughter takes oath as Philippine vice president
Sara Duterte, the daughter of the outgoing populist president of the Philippines, has taken her oath as vice president following a landslide electoral victory she clinched despite her father’s human rights record that saw thousands of drug suspects gunned down
8:27PM ( 10 hours ago )
Ex-rebel holds slim lead in Colombia's presidential runoff
Former leftist rebel Gustavo Petro holds a slim lead in Colombia’s presidential runoff election Sunday over a real estate millionaire, and is on the cusp of ushering in a new era of politics in the South American country
6:13PM ( 12 hours ago )
AP World News
Starbucks head of North America business leaving company
Rossann Williams, Starbucks’ North America president who’s been a prominent figure in the company’s push against worker unionization, is leaving the company after 17 years
6:05PM ( 12 hours ago )
Maryland Apple workers face hurdles after vote to unionize
The historic vote by employees of a Maryland Apple store to unionize — a first for the technology giant — is a significant step in a lengthy process that labor experts say is heavily stacked against workers in favor of their employers
4:12PM ( 14 hours ago )
Bitcoin inches up above psychological threshold of $20,000
The price of a bitcoin has inched above $20,000 after the broader crypto selloff dragged it below the psychological threshold a day earlier
4:10PM ( 14 hours ago )
AP Business
Last-ditch talks aim to avert disruptive UK rail strike
Unions and train companies in Britain are set to hold last-minute talks Monday aimed at averting the country’s biggest rail strikes for decades
6:07AM ( 29 minutes ago )
Belgium returns Congo independence hero's tooth to family
Belgian authorities have returned a gold-capped tooth of the slain Congolese independence hero Patrice Lumumba
6:00AM ( 36 minutes ago )
World shares mixed; bitcoin holds steady near $20,000
European benchmarks are higher after most Asian markets retreated, while the price of bitcoin hovered near $20,000
5:36AM ( 1 hour ago )
What to watch in Alabama Senate runoff, DC mayor's race
The two Republican candidates in Alabama’s U.S. Senate primary runoff on Tuesday can each boast that at one point they had Donald Trump’s endorsement in the race
5:34AM ( 1 hour ago )
Unlikely duo: Pennsylvania Democrats aim for united front
The fate of the Democratic Party is intertwined in a pair of Pennsylvania elections that’ll be closely watched this year
5:29AM ( 1 hour ago )