rain.png
Thursday August 11th, 2022 1:28PM

Heat wave keeps Midwest and South in its sticky grip

By The Associated Press

CHICAGO (AP) — People flocked to pools, beaches and cooling centers in a swath of the Midwest and South spanning from northern Florida to the Great Lakes on Wednesday as a heat wave pushed temperatures into the 90s and beyond and may have caused the deaths of at least two people.

The National Weather Service maintained an excessive heat warning through Wednesday evening for most of Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, which have been dealing with the sticky humidity and soaring temperatures since Tuesday. And the heat advisory in place for the Midwest and South stretched all the way eastward to the South Carolina shoreline, covering an area that is home to roughly a third of the country's population.

Meteorologists warned that the high temperatures could be dangerous or deadly for some people and advised residents to stay hydrated, remain indoors if possible and take precautions if they must be outside. Driving home the point, the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office tweeted Wednesday that it was investigating the deaths of an 89-year-old man and 39-year-old woman for “probable” connections to the heat.

“There are a lot of vulnerable populations exposed to this heat,” University of Georgia meteorology professor Marshall Shepherd said. "I am particularly concerned about the elevated nighttime temperature. That’s what kills people if they are not adequately prepared or have the appropriate resources. Hurricanes get the headlines, but heat kills more people every year in the U.S.”

As temperatures soared into the 90s in downtown Indianapolis on Wednesday, Gary Lightle kneeled on the hot steps of the Indiana World War Memorial to replace some aging caulking. He wore a wide-brimmed hat and began his work day around 7 a.m. but said the heat dictates how long he stays outside.

“Yesterday it just got so miserable that we decided to quit at 3,” he said.

Foreman CJ Thrasher’s workday starts even earlier — around 5 a.m., he said, to beat the heat — with usually a 2 p.m. wrap-up.

Thrasher worked quickly to apply glue to the side of a stone wall on W Ohio Street. In the heat, the sealant stiffens faster than in cooler weather, he said, so the glue becomes less malleable.

“With this heat, just like that, it’s done,” Thrasher said, setting a small tile on an open space in the wall.

For those off the clock, Wednesday's heat inspired trips to the beach, river, pool or splash pad, launching the summer swimming season a bit earlier than usual in some northern locales. Authorities throughout the affected area encouraged people without access to air conditioning to use public cooling centers, libraries and other public places to escape from the heat and humidity.

Some areas were expected to get relief by Thursday. But the hot weather moving out could bring severe thunderstorms Wednesday to Iowa, Wisconsin and points eastward, including Michigan, according to the weather service's Storm Prediction Center. Those storms could dump large hail or spawn tornadoes or damaging straight-line winds.

Utilities sorted out many of the power outages caused by storms that swept through the Midwest early in the week, but more than 200,000 customers remained without power still as of Wednesday afternoon, according to poweroutage.us.

Joe Champion said he'd experienced intermittent outages at his home in Columbus, Ohio, since Tuesday afternoon. Champion, 38, said he spent part of Tuesday evening in his car running the air conditioning, despite soaring gas prices in the U.S.

“There was just no way I could sit in the house,” he said.

Meanwhile, crews worked to restore water service Wednesday to the West Texas city of Odessa, where residents have gone without it this week amid scorching temperatures because an aging pipe broke.

___

Associated Press writers Seth Borenstein in Washington, Gretchen Ehlke in Milwaukee, Arleigh Rodgers in Indianapolis and Claire Savage in Chicago contributed to this report. Rodgers and Savage are corps members for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

  • Associated Categories: U.S. News, Associated Press (AP), AP National News, Top U.S. News short headlines, AP Online - Georgia News, AP Online Headlines - Georgia News
© Copyright 2022 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
Heat wave keeps Midwest and South in its sticky grip
The swimming season has kicked into high gear early in a large swath of the U.S., as a heat wave pushed temperatures into the 90s and beyond in a stretch spanning from northern Florida to the Great Lakes and covering about a third of the country’s population
4:44PM ( 5 minutes ago )
This is how a higher Fed rate could affect your finances
Record low-interest mortgages are long gone
4:40PM ( 9 minutes ago )
New SBC President commits to move sex abuse reforms forward
Bart Barber, the newly elected president of the Southern Baptist Convention, is vowing to expedite sex abuse reforms in the nation’s largest Protestant denomination
4:22PM ( 27 minutes ago )
U.S. News
Lawyer: Cosby must be held responsible for sex abuse of teen
An attorney for a woman suing Bill Cosby told jurors they must hold him responsible for sexually abusing her at the Playboy Mansion when she was 16 years old in 1975
4:39PM ( 11 minutes ago )
Wall Street rallies in relief after Fed's assurance on rates
Stocks rallied in a roller-coaster day of trading on Wall Street Wednesday after the Federal Reserve hiked interest rates by the biggest margin since 1994, but also said such mega-hikes would not be common
4:38PM ( 11 minutes ago )
Pakistani govt chided for 'Drink less tea, save money' plea
A minister in Pakistan’s newly elected government is facing criticism following his plea to the nation to drink less tea to help save on imports amid a deepening economic crisis
4:38PM ( 11 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
Buffalo supermarket gunman charged with federal hate crimes
The gunman who killed 10 Black people in a racist attack at a Buffalo supermarket has been charged with federal hate crimes that could potentially carry a death penalty
3:59PM ( 50 minutes ago )
John Hinkley Jr. freed from court oversight after decades
John Hinckley Jr. has been freed from court oversight
2:59PM ( 1 hour ago )
Odessa, Texas, without drinking water as temperatures soar
Crews are working to restore water service to the West Texas city of Odessa, where residents have been without water amid scorching temperatures this week after an aging pipe broke
2:56PM ( 1 hour ago )
AP National News
Independent booksellers grew in number, diversity in 2021
Independent booksellers are growing in number and becoming more diverse
11:45AM ( 5 hours ago )
Floods leave Yellowstone landscape 'dramatically changed'
Historic floodwaters that raged through Yellowstone National Park may have permanently altered the course of a popular fishing river and left the sweeping landscape forever changed
10:51AM ( 5 hours ago )
FDA advisers weigh COVID-19 shots for babies, young children
U.S. government advisers met Wednesday to decide whether to endorse COVID-19 shots for the youngest children, moving the nation closer to vaccinations for all ages
10:17AM ( 6 hours ago )
Top U.S. News short headlines
Jan. 6 panel releases video of Capitol tour before attack
The House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021 Capitol insurrection released video on Wednesday of a Capitol tour led by a Republican lawmaker the day before the attack, showing at least one participant taking photos of stairwells and tunnels in the Capitol complex
3:00PM ( 1 hour ago )
FIFA to announce 2026 World Cup US sites, paring from 17
FIFA plans to announce the 2026 World Cup sites, trimming the U.S. list from 17 to 10-12
2:53PM ( 1 hour ago )
Nats' Stephen Strasburg has rib injury, will see specialist
Washington Nationals right-hander Stephen Strasburg has been placed on the 15-day injured list with a stress reaction of the ribs
7:50PM ( 21 hours ago )
AP Online - Georgia News
This is how a higher Fed rate could affect your finances
Record low-interest mortgages are long gone
4:40PM ( 9 minutes ago )
New SBC President commits to move sex abuse reforms forward
Bart Barber, the newly elected president of the Southern Baptist Convention, is vowing to expedite sex abuse reforms in the nation’s largest Protestant denomination
4:22PM ( 28 minutes ago )
Alaska kids served sealant instead of milk at school program
A dozen students and two adults were served floor sealant instead of milk at a day care summer program at an Alaska elementary school
4:20PM ( 30 minutes ago )
Despite push, states slow to make Juneteenth a paid holiday
The effort to officially celebrate Juneteenth as a paid holiday has faced skepticism inside legislatures that have largely chosen symbolic gestures to recognize the holiday while curtailing certain conversations on race and racism
3:57PM ( 53 minutes ago )
FDA advisers move COVID-19 shots closer for kids under 5
COVID-19 shots for infants, toddlers and preschoolers in the U.S. have moved a step closer
3:53PM ( 56 minutes ago )