sunny.png
Saturday May 21st, 2022 7:52AM

US pediatricians' group moves to abandon race-based guidance

By The Associated Press

For years, pediatricians have followed flawed guidelines linking race to risks for urinary infections and newborn jaundice. In a new policy announced Monday, the American Academy of Pediatrics said it is putting all its guidance under the microscope to eliminate “race-based” medicine and resulting health disparities.

A re-examination of AAP treatment recommendations that began before George Floyd’s 2020 death and intensified after it has doctors concerned that Black youngsters have been undertreated and overlooked, said Dr. Joseph Wright, lead author of the new policy and chief health equity officer at the University of Maryland's medical system.

The influential academy has begun purging outdated advice. It is committing to scrutinizing its “entire catalog,” including guidelines, educational materials, textbooks and newsletter articles, Wright said.

“We are really being much more rigorous about the ways in which we assess risk for disease and health outcomes," Wright said. “We do have to hold ourselves accountable in that way. It’s going to require a heavy lift."

Dr. Brittani James, a family medicine doctor and medical director for a Chicago health center, said the academy is making a pivotal move.

“What makes this so monumental is the fact that this is a medical institution and it’s not just words. They’re acting," James said.

In recent years, other major doctor groups including the American Medical Association have made similar pledges. They are spurred in part by civil rights and social justice movements, but also by science showing the strong roles that social conditions, genetics and other biological factors play in determining health.

Last year, the academy retired a guideline calculation based on the unproven idea that Black children faced lower risks than white kids for urinary infections. A review had shown that the strongest risk factors were prior urinary infections and fevers lasting more than 48 hours, not race, Wright said.

A revision to its newborn jaundice guidance — which currently suggests certain races have higher and lower risks — is planned for this summer, Wright said.

Dr. Nia Heard-Garris, head of an academy group on minority health and equity and a pediatrician at Chicago’s Lurie Children’s Hospital, noted that the new policy includes a brief history “of how some of our frequently used clinical aids have come to be — via pseudoscience and racism.”

Whatever the intent, these aids have harmed patients, she said.

“This violates our oath as physicians — to do no harm — and as such should not be used,″ Heard-Garris said.

Dr. Valencia Walker, a specialist in newborn care and health equity at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, called the new policy “a critical step” toward reducing racial health disparities.

The academy is urging other medical institutions and specialty groups to take a similar approach in working to eliminate racism in medicine.

"We can’t just plug up one leak in a pipe full of holes and expect it to be remedied," said Heard-Garris. “This statement shines a light for pediatricians and other healthcare providers to find and patch those holes.”

___

Follow AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner at @LindseyTanner.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

___

This story has been corrected to show Dr. Walker’s first name is Valencia, not Valerie.

  • Associated Categories: U.S. News, Associated Press (AP), AP National News, Top U.S. News short headlines, Top General short headlines, AP Health, AP Health - Children's Health
© Copyright 2022 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
Asian shares fall in thin trading after rout on Wall St
Asian shares are lower following a sell-off Friday on Wall Street
11:38PM ( 37 minutes ago )
New Zealand welcomes back tourists as pandemic rules eased
New Zealand has begun welcoming back tourists from the U.S., Canada, Britain, Japan and more than 50 other countries for the first time in more than two years after dropping most of its remaining pandemic border restrictions
11:23PM ( 53 minutes ago )
Muslims mark Eid al-Fitr holiday with joy, worry
Muslims are observing the Islamic holiday of Eid al-Fitr, typically marked with communal prayers, celebratory gatherings around festive meals and new clothes
11:13PM ( 1 hour ago )
Associated Press (AP)
The Judds, Ray Charles join the Country Music Hall of Fame
Ray Charles and The Judds joined the Country Music Hall of Fame on Sunday, just a day after Naomi Judd died unexpectedly
8:56PM ( 3 hours ago )
Evacuations under way in Mariupol; Pelosi visits Ukraine
An operation to evacuate civilians from a steel plant in the Ukrainian city of Mariupol is under way
8:22PM ( 3 hours ago )
Live updates l Explosion damages railway bridge in Kursk
An explosive device damaged a railway bridge in the Kursk region of Russia, which borders Ukraine, and a criminal investigation has been started
6:50PM ( 5 hours ago )
AP National News
Tourists, rejoice! Italy, Greece relax COVID-19 restrictions
For travelers going to southern Europe, summer vacations just got a whole lot easier
3:06PM ( 9 hours ago )
Black doctors say they face discrimination based on race
After Dr. Dare Adewumi was hired to lead the neurosurgery practice at an Atlanta-area hospital, he says he quickly faced racial discrimination that ultimately led to his firing
10:24AM ( 13 hours ago )
China's 'zero-COVID' restrictions curb May 1 holiday travel
Many Chinese are marking a quiet May Day holiday this year as the government’s “zero-COVID” approach restricts travel and enforces lockdowns in multiple cities
9:02AM ( 15 hours ago )
AP Health
FDA sets June meetings on COVID vaccines for youngest kids
The Food and Drug Administration has set tentative dates in June to publicly review COVID-19 vaccines for the youngest American children
3:13PM ( 2 days ago )
Moderna seeks to be 1st with COVID shots for littlest kids
Moderna is asking U.S. regulators to open its COVID-19 vaccine to the nation's youngest children
12:59PM ( 3 days ago )
COVID shots still work but researchers hunt new improvements
COVID-19 vaccines still offer strong protection against severe illness and death, but Moderna and Pfizer are testing combination shots as a possible new kind of booster
8:55AM ( 1 week ago )
AP Health - Children's Health
Asian shares fall in thin trading after rout on Wall St
Asian shares are lower following a sell-off Friday on Wall Street
11:38PM ( 38 minutes ago )
New Zealand welcomes back tourists as pandemic rules eased
New Zealand has begun welcoming back tourists from the U.S., Canada, Britain, Japan and more than 50 other countries for the first time in more than two years after dropping most of its remaining pandemic border restrictions
11:23PM ( 53 minutes ago )
Muslims mark Eid al-Fitr holiday with joy, worry
Muslims are observing the Islamic holiday of Eid al-Fitr, typically marked with communal prayers, celebratory gatherings around festive meals and new clothes
11:13PM ( 1 hour ago )
2 people rescued 50 hours after China building collapse
Two people have been rescued from the rubble of a building in central China more than 50 hours after it collapsed
11:01PM ( 1 hour ago )
Live updates l Commander glad for steel mill evacuations
The deputy commander of the Azov Regiment says he's glad evacuations had begun at a steel mill where civilians and fighters have holed up in the last section of Mariupol not controlled by the Russians
11:00PM ( 1 hour ago )