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Sunday August 14th, 2022 10:01PM

US added 431,000 jobs in March in sign of economic health

By The Associated Press
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America’s employers extended a streak of robust hiring in March, adding 431,000 jobs in a sign of the economy’s resilience in the face of a still-destructive pandemic, Russia's war against Ukraine and the highest inflation in 40 years.

The government’s report Friday showed that last month’s job growth helped shrink the unemployment rate to 3.6%. That's the lowest rate since the pandemic erupted two years ago and just above the half-century low of 3.5% that was reached two years ago.

Despite the inflation surge, persistent supply bottlenecks, damage from COVID-19 and now a war in Europe, employers have added at least 400,000 jobs for 11 straight months. In its report, the government also sharply revised up its estimate of hiring in January and February by a combined 95,000 jobs.

The job growth in March, though solid, was the lowest since September and slightly below what economists had expected. Still, Vincent Reinhart, chief economist at Dreyfus and Mellon, said the numbers show that “the U.S. economy continues to have underlying momentum and that firms are taking workers when they can.″

The March report sketched a bright picture of the job market, with steady hiring and rising wages. Average hourly pay has risen a strong 5.6% over the past 12 months, welcome news for employees across the economy. For leisure and hospitality workers, including people who work in hotels, restaurants and bars, average pay has jumped 11.8% from a year earlier — “a clear sign that employers are desperate for staff," said Saru Jayaraman, president of One Fair Wage, which advocates for better pay and conditions for service employees.

For most workers, though, pay raises aren't keeping up with the spike in inflation that has put the Federal Reserve on track to raise rates multiple times, perhaps aggressively, in the coming months. Those rate hikes will result in costlier loans for many consumers and businesses. In the meantime, worker pay raises, a response in many cases to labor shortages, are themselves feeding the economy's inflation pressures.

The steady job growth has failed to buoy President Joe Biden’s flagging popularity, with the gains overshadowed in the public's mind by chronically high inflation. With Russia’s invasion of Ukraine driving oil and gasoline prices higher, Biden has announced plans to release a million barrels of oil daily from the U.S. strategic reserve for the next six months.

Since the pandemic struck in 2020, many Americans have remained on the sidelines of the job market, a trend that has contributed to the worker shortage in many industries. But in an encouraging sign for the economy, 418,000 people began looking for a job in March, and many found one. Over the past year, 3.8 million people have rejoined the labor force, meaning they now either have a job or are looking for one.

Across the economy, hiring gains were widespread last month. Restaurants and bars added 61,000 jobs, retailers 49,000, manufacturers 38,000 and hotels 25,000. Construction jobs rose by 19,000 and have now returned to their pre-pandemic level.

Some economists sounded a note of caution, though, suggesting that the prospect of much higher borrowing rates engineered by the Fed will inevitably slow the job market and the overall economy.

“We continue to expect that the Federal Reserve will move rates up expeditiously to counter surging inflation, and that this report only adds more urgency to their plans to do so,’’ said Mike Fratantoni, chief economist at the Mortgage Bankers Association.

For now, the job market continues to rebound from the coronavirus recession. Fueled by generous federal aid, savings amassed during the pandemic and ultra-low borrowing rates orchestrated by the Fed, U.S. consumers have spent so fast that many factories, warehouses, shipping companies and ports have failed to keep pace with their customer demand. Supply chains have snarled, forcing up prices.

The proportion of Americans who are either working or looking for work — the so-called labor force participation rate — ticked up to 62.4% last month, the highest since the early days of the pandemic in March 2020. Even so, the participation rate remains a full percentage point below its pre-pandemic level, limiting the pool of potential job applicants employers can choose from. Many Americans remain on the sidelines because of lingering health concerns and trouble finding childcare.

“You can't keep adding 400,000 workers a month without running out of workers,'' said Reinhart, a former high-ranking Fed economist.

Reinhart said he expects higher interest rates, on top of the expiration of government aid, to eventually slow hiring to “a more sustainable" pace.

“The bad news," he said, "is we haven't yet recovered the pre-pandemic level of employment, and it will take longer" to get there.

Labor Secretary Marty Walsh suggested Friday that the streak of hiring gains may be “sustainable for a little while'' but that “the key to us going forward'' would be drawing more Americans back to the job market.

Karen Fichuk, CEO of the staffing company Randstad North America, noted that the economy now has a record 1.7 job openings for every unemployed person.

“Even if you get all the unemployed workers back, it still leaves a gap,’’ she said. “We need to attract people back into the workforce.’’

In particular, Fichuk said, businesses need to draw more women back by, for example, offering flexible hours and childcare centers or stipends for childcare expenses.

It’s unclear how long the economy can maintain its momentum of the past year, especially as high inflation pinches family budgets and the Fed's rate hikes slow economic activity. Hourly pay, adjusted for higher consumer prices, fell 2.6% in February from a year earlier — the 11th straight month in which inflation has outpaced year-over-year wage growth. According to AAA, average gasoline prices, at $4.23 a gallon, are up a dizzying 47% from a year ago.

At the same time, the job market has kept hurtling ahead. Employers posted a near-record 11.3 million positions in February. Nearly 4.4 million Americans quit their jobs, a sign of confidence that they could find something better.

At Threshold Brands, a company in Newport Beach, California, that operates eight brands specializing in home services and repair, franchisees are struggling to hire fast enough to keep up with orders.

“If they could just add more people, they could meet all that demand,’’ said Hagan Kappler, the company's CEO. “They’re having to turn business away.’’

Some businesses are trying novel ways to hire and retain employees. InHome Therapy in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, needs highly skilled physical, occupational and speech therapists to treat patients in their homes. Besides paying therapist salaries of $90,000 to $120,000 a year, InHome provides company cars and helps employees repay student loans.

“They longer they stay with us,” said CEO Matt Murphy, “the more of their student loans we’ll help them pay back.”

___

AP Writer Josh Boak contributed to this report.

  • Associated Categories: Associated Press (AP), AP National News, AP Online National News, Top General short headlines, AP Business, AP Business - Economy
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