fair.png
Friday July 1st, 2022 7:27PM

2nd election for Amazon workers in Alabama will be by mail

By The Associated Press
Related Articles
  Contact Editor

A federal labor board said that Amazon workers in Bessemer, Alabama, will vote by mail next month in a re-run election to decide whether or not to unionize.

The National Labor Relations Board said Tuesday that the ballots will be mailed out Feb. 4 and must be returned before the counting starts on March 28.

The move comes roughly a month and a half after the board ordered a new union election for Amazon workers based on objections by the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union to the first vote that took place in April.

The move was a blow to Amazon.com Inc., which spent about a year aggressively campaigning for warehouse workers in Bessemer to reject the union, which they ultimately did by a wide margin.

In a 20-page decision, the regional director for the NLRB Lisa Henderson focused much attention on Amazon’s installation of a U.S. Postal Service mailbox at the main employee entrance, which may have created the false impression that the company was the one conducting the election process. Henderson also rejected Amazon’s argument that it was making voting easier and was trying to encourage as high a turnout as possible.

“Our employees have always had the choice of whether or not to join a union, and they overwhelmingly chose not to join the RWDSU last year," said Amazon spokeswoman Barbara Agrait in an emailed statement Tuesday, adding that she looks forward to having its team in Bessemer ‘”having their voices heard again."

Meanwhile, the RWDSU took issue with NLRB's decision to hold an election by mail.

“We are deeply concerned that the decision fails to adequately prevent Amazon from continuing its objectionable behavior in a new election," said the union in a statement. The union is pushing for in-person election, which it feels could make the process fairer to workers.

RWDSU faces an uphill battle to unionize workers given such high quit rates, but Amazon did reach a settlement with the NLRB last month to allow its employees to freely organize — and without retaliation.

According to the settlement, the online behemoth said it would reach out to its warehouse workers — former and current — via email who were on the job anytime from March 22 of last year to notify them of their organizing rights.

The settlement outlined that Amazon workers, which number 750,000 in the U.S., have more room to organize within the buildings. For example, Amazon pledged it will not threaten workers with discipline or call the police when they are engaging in union activity in exterior non-work areas during non-work time.

______

Follow Anne D’Innocenzio: http://twitter.com/ADInnocenzio

  • Associated Categories: Associated Press (AP), AP Business
© Copyright 2022 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
Fed's Powell: High inflation poses a threat to job market
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Tuesday that high inflation is a serious threat to the Fed’s goal of helping put more Americans back to work, and said the Fed will raise rates more than it now plans if needed to stem surging prices
2:31PM ( 4 minutes ago )
California lawmakers debate universal health care proposal
California lawmakers are set to debate whether to create the nation's first universal health care system
2:11PM ( 24 minutes ago )
2nd election for Amazon workers in Alabama will be by mail
A federal labor board said that Amazon workers in a facility in Bessemer, Alabama will vote by mail next month in a re-run election to decide whether or not to unionize
2:10PM ( 26 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
EPA moves to crack down on dangerous coal ash storage ponds
The Environmental Protection Agency is taking its first major action to address toxic wastewater from coal-burning power plants, ordering utilities to stop dumping waste into unlined storage ponds and speed up plans to close leaking or otherwise dangerous coal ash sites
1:08PM ( 1 hour ago )
Bank of America slashes fees for account overdrafts
Bank of America is slashing the amount it charges customers when they spend more than they have in their accounts and plans to eliminate entirely its fees for bounced checks
12:58PM ( 1 hour ago )
US women, men have not committed to single-pay structure
The head of the U.S. Soccer Federation says the unions for the women’s and men’s national teams have not committed to agreeing to a single pay structure
12:56PM ( 1 hour ago )
AP Business
Fed's Powell: High inflation poses a threat to job market
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Tuesday that high inflation is a serious threat to the Fed’s goal of helping put more Americans back to work, and said the Fed will raise rates more than it now plans if needed to stem surging prices
2:31PM ( 4 minutes ago )
California lawmakers debate universal health care proposal
California lawmakers are set to debate whether to create the nation's first universal health care system
2:11PM ( 24 minutes ago )
US stocks shed early loss, rise as tech stocks gain ground
Stocks shed an early loss and rose in afternoon trading on Wall Street Tuesday as technology stocks reversed course and turned higher
2:00PM ( 35 minutes ago )
49ers-Cowboys playoff rivalry resumes after long wait
Kyle Shanahan was a teenager watching on the sideline when the heated playoff rivalry between the Dallas Cowboys and San Francisco 49ers reached a fever pitch with three straight NFC title game matchups
1:57PM ( 38 minutes ago )
Hospital helper nearly overlooks brother after NYC fire
A New York man who helped take people to the hospital after a deadly New York City fire nearly overlooked his own brother in the aftermath of the blaze
1:57PM ( 38 minutes ago )