clearn.png
Monday November 29th, 2021 5:51AM

Hurricane Ida's aftermath, recovery uneven across Louisiana

By The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — In much of New Orleans, an ongoing power outage after Hurricane Ida is making the sweltering summer unbearable. But in some areas outside the city, that misery is compounded by a lack of water, flooded neighborhoods and severely damaged homes.

Four days after Hurricane Ida struck, the storm's aftermath — and progress in recovering from it — are being felt unevenly across affected communities in Louisiana. The levee system revamped after Katrina protected New Orleans from catastrophic flooding after Ida struck on Sunday with 150 mph (230 kph) winds, tied for the fifth-strongest hurricane to ever hit the mainland U.S.

The power was back on before dawn Thursday in parts of the city's central business district, Uptown, Midtown, New Orleans East and the Carrollton area, the electricity company Entergy announced. Utility crews also restored power to Ochsner’s main hospital campus in Jefferson Parish and several hospitals near Baton Rouge.

About 35,000 of the 405,000 homes and businesses in New Orleans and Jefferson Parish had power Thursday morning, according to the poweroutage.us website. Statewide, 917,000 customers were without electricity, down from about 1.1 million at the height of the storm.

The hurricane tore apart water systems too. At least 600,000 customers had no running water, while hundreds of thousands of other homes and business were being told to boil their water before using it.

At least five deaths were blamed on the storm in Louisiana and Mississippi, while at least 15 deaths have been confirmed in Maryland and the Northeast, with officials warning there likely will be more. Ida’s remnants have caused catastrophic flooding in New York City and surrounding areas. Rivers overran their banks in Pennsylvania, and tornadoes struck around Philadelphia.

In New Orleans, city crews completely cleared some streets of fallen trees and debris and a few corner stores reopened.

Outside New Orleans, neighborhoods remained flooded and residents were still reeling from damage to their homes and property. More than 1,200 people were walking through some of Ida’s hardest-hit communities to look for those needing help, according to the Louisiana Fire Marshal’s office. President Joe Biden was scheduled to visit Louisiana on Friday to survey the damage, the White House said.

Gayle Lawrence lost two cars, refrigerators and almost everything in her garage to floodwaters in southern Louisiana’s Plaquemines Parish. The garage was filled with marsh grass and dead fish. Scores of other homes in the neighborhood were also flooded.

“The house is solid. It didn’t even move. But when the water came up, it destroyed everything,” she said.

In Jefferson Parish, authorities on Wednesday were still waiting for floodwaters to recede enough for trucks carrying food, water and repair supplies to begin moving into Lafitte and other low-lying communities. The parish neighbors New Orleans and saw widespread destruction from Ida.

Parish President Cynthia Lee Sheng said a gas shortage was hampering hospital staff, food bank employees and other critical workers.

“Today, we’re a broken community,” Sheng told a news conference. "It won’t always be that way.”

Evacuees considering returning home to Terrebonne Parish were warned by emergency officials on Twitter that “there are no shelters, no electricity, very limited resources for food, gasoline and supplies and absolutely no medical services.”

The leader of Louisiana’s largest hospital system, Ochsner Health, is considering opening a field hospital somewhere in Terrebonne or Lafourche parish because the shuttering of most of the hospitals in the area removed about 250 to 300 beds. When "folks come back, this is going to definitely put a strain on the situation,” Ochsner President and CEO Warner Thomas told reporters.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said he's pleased that power returned for some people.

“I’m very mindful that it’s a start, and only a start,” he told a news conference.

As the staggering scope of the disaster began to come into focus, with a private firm estimating that total damage from Ida could exceed $50 billion, making it among the costliest U.S. hurricanes.

Hard-hit areas in southeast Louisiana were under a heat advisory Thursday, with forecasters warning combined heat and humidity could make some areas feel like 106 degrees Fahrenheit (41 degrees Celsius).

New Orleans officials opened seven places where people could get a meal and sit in air conditioning. The city was also using 70 transit buses as cooling sites, Mayor LaToya Cantrell said.

Karen Evans charged electronic devices at a New Orleans gym where four tall fans stirred the air. Her home in the city was not damaged, but she was struggling without power.

“The great challenge is living a life in a sweltering place without air conditioning,” she said.

____

Deslatte reported from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Associated Press writers Kevin McGill in New Orleans; Stacey Plaisance in Lafitte, Louisiana; Jeff Martin in Marietta, Georgia; Emily Wagster Pettus in Jackson, Mississippi; Seth Borenstein in Kensington, Maryland; Sudhin Thanawala in Atlanta; and Russ Bynum in Savannah, Georgia, contributed to this report.

  • Associated Categories: U.S. News, Associated Press (AP), AP National News, AP Online National News, Top U.S. News short headlines, Top General short headlines, AP Business, AP Business - Industries, AP Business - Utilities
© Copyright 2021 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
Hurricane Ida's aftermath, recovery uneven across Louisiana
Four days after Hurricane Ida struck, the storm's aftermath and progress in recovering from it are being felt unevenly across Louisiana
1:00AM ( 3 minutes ago )
Lake Tahoe wildfire seemed controllable, then it wasn't
Last week, managers overseeing the fight against the massive wildfire scorching California’s Lake Tahoe region thought they could have it contained by the start of this week
12:43AM ( 21 minutes ago )
Changing winds provide hope in California wildfire battle
Fire officials say gusty winds are calming and giving them a chance to throw all their resources into boxing a California blaze that is scant miles from Lake Tahoe and neighboring Nevada
12:34AM ( 30 minutes ago )
U.S. News
'What's the issue?' Tsitsipas undaunted by boos at US Open
Stefanos Tsitsipas has heard boos from the crowd for yet another long trip off court after dropping a set during a second-round victory over Adrian Mannarino
12:44AM ( 19 minutes ago )
Milley: US coordination with Taliban on strikes 'possible'
The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Army Gen. Mark Milley, says it’s “possible” the U.S. will coordinate with the Taliban on any future counterterrorism strikes in Afghanistan against Islamic State militants or others
12:32AM ( 32 minutes ago )
AP sources: Intel shows extremists to attend Capitol rally
Far right extremist groups like the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers are planning to attend a rally later this month at the U.S. Capitol that is designed to demand “justice” for the hundreds of people who have been charged in connection with January’s insurrection
12:29AM ( 35 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
The Latest: Moderna, Japan partner recall 1.6 million doses
Moderna Inc. and its Japanese partner are recalling more than 1 million doses of the U.S. drug maker’s coronavirus vaccine after confirming contamination reported last week was tiny particles of stainless steel
11:58PM ( 1 hour ago )
Ida remnants pound Northeast with rain, flooding, tornadoes
The remnants of Hurricane Ida blew through the mid-Atlantic states with at least two tornadoes, heavy winds and drenching rains
11:57PM ( 1 hour ago )
Asian stock markets gain ahead of US jobs data
Asian stock markets are higher as investors waited for U.S. jobs data that might influence when the Federal Reserve starts to wind down its stimulus
11:52PM ( 1 hour ago )
AP Business
Auto maker Stellantis will fill gap by buying a finance arm
Stellantis, the car company that includes Chrysler and Fiat, is getting into the auto-finance business
7:38PM ( 5 hours ago )
The Latest: Ontario to require COVID-19 vaccine certificates
Ontario has become the fourth Canadian province to announce residents will soon have to show proof of vaccination against COVID-19 to enter restaurants, theaters, gyms and other indoor public venues
4:18PM ( 8 hours ago )
In Ida's aftermath, no quick relief in sight for Louisiana
Louisiana residents still reeling from flooding and damage caused by Hurricane Ida are scrambling for food, gas, water and relief from the oppressive heat
2:10PM ( 10 hours ago )
AP Business - Industries
Even in backup role, federal government supports Ida victims
Response to disasters such as Hurricane Ida falls primarily to state and local officials, but the federal government is playing an important support role
10:34PM ( 1 day ago )
Ida's sweltering aftermath: No power, no water, no gasoline
Louisiana communities battered by Hurricane Ida are now dealing with the possibility of weeks without power in the stifling, late-summer heat
9:18PM ( 1 day ago )
S&P 500 ends August higher, its 7th straight monthly gain
Stocks ended a wobbly day with mixed results on Wall Street Tuesday, but the S&P 500 still managed to close out August with a solid gain
4:32PM ( 1 day ago )
AP Business - Utilities
Lake Tahoe wildfire seemed controllable, then it wasn't
Last week, managers overseeing the fight against the massive wildfire scorching California’s Lake Tahoe region thought they could have it contained by the start of this week
12:43AM ( 21 minutes ago )
Changing winds provide hope in California wildfire battle
Fire officials say gusty winds are calming and giving them a chance to throw all their resources into boxing a California blaze that is scant miles from Lake Tahoe and neighboring Nevada
12:34AM ( 30 minutes ago )
'It looked apocalyptic': Crew describes Afghan departure
The U.S. military pilots and aircrew who made the final flights out of Afghanistan say the sky was lit up with fireworks and sporadic gunfire and the airfield littered with battered shells of airplanes and destroyed equipment
12:24AM ( 40 minutes ago )
AP Explains: Congress asks tech companies for Jan. 6 records
A House committee investigating the U.S. Capitol insurrection has requested that telecommunications and social media companies preserve the personal communications of hundreds of people who may have somehow been connected to the attack
12:22AM ( 41 minutes ago )
What can employers do if workers avoid COVID-19 vaccines?
More companies are requiring COVID-19 vaccines and taking actions to motivate employees into getting their shots
12:13AM ( 51 minutes ago )