clearn.png
Friday April 16th, 2021 3:56AM

National security officials to testify on Jan. 6 mistakes

By The Associated Press
Related Articles
  Contact Editor

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal national security officials are set to testify in the second Senate hearing about what went wrong on Jan. 6, facing questions about missed intelligence and botched efforts to quickly gather National Guard troops that day as a violent mob laid siege to the U.S. Capitol.

Senators are eager Wednesday to grill the officials from the Pentagon, the National Guard and the Justice and Homeland Security departments about their preparations as supporters of then-President Donald Trump talked online, in some cases openly, about gathering in Washington and interrupting the electoral count.

At a hearing last week, officials who were in charge of security at the Capitol blamed each other as well as federal law enforcement for their own lack of preparation as hundreds of rioters descended on the building, easily breached the security perimeter and eventually broke into the Capitol itself. Five people died as a result of the rioting.

So far, lawmakers conducting investigations have focused on failed efforts to gather and share intelligence about the insurrectionists’ planning before Jan. 6 and on the deliberations among officials about whether and when to call National Guard troops to protect Congress. The officials at the hearing last week, including ousted Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, gave conflicting accounts of those negotiations. Robert Contee, the acting chief of police for the Metropolitan Police Department, told senators he was “stunned” over the delayed response and said Sund was pleading with Army officials to deploy National Guard troops as the rioting rapidly escalated.

Senate Rules Committee Chairwoman Amy Klobuchar, one of two Democratic senators who will preside over Wednesday's hearing, said in an interview Tuesday that she believes every moment counted as the National Guard decision was delayed and police officers outside the Capitol were beaten and injured by the rioters.

“Any minute that we lost, I need to know why,” Klobuchar said.

The hearing comes as thousands of National Guard troops are still patrolling the fenced-in Capitol and as multiple committees across Congress are launching investigations into mistakes made on Jan. 6. The probes are largely focused on security missteps and the origins of the extremism that led hundreds of Trump’s supporters to break through the doors and windows of the Capitol, hunt for lawmakers and temporarily stop the counting of electoral votes. Congress has, for now, abandoned any examination of Trump’s role in the attack after the Senate acquitted him last month of inciting the riot by telling the supporters that morning to “fight like hell” to overturn his defeat.

As the Senate hears from the federal officials, acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman will testify before a House panel that is also looking into how security failed. In a hearing last week before the same subcommittee, she conceded there were multiple levels of failures but denied that law enforcement failed to take seriously warnings of violence before the Jan. 6 insurrection.

In the Senate, Klobuchar said there is particular interest in hearing from Maj. Gen. William Walker, the commanding general of the D.C. National Guard, who was on the phone with Sund and the Department of the Army as the rioters first broke into the building. Contee, the D.C. police chief, was also on the call and told senators that the Army was initially reluctant to send troops.

“While I certainly understand the importance of both planning and public perception — the factors cited by the staff on the call — these issues become secondary when you are watching your employees, vastly outnumbered by a mob, being physically assaulted,” Contee said. He said he had quickly deployed his own officers and he was “shocked” that the National Guard “could not — or would not — do the same."

Contee said that Army staff said they were not refusing to send troops, but “did not like the optics of boots on the ground” at the Capitol.

Also testifying at the joint hearing of the Senate Rules Committee and the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committees are Robert Salesses of the Defense Department, Melissa Smislova of the Department of Homeland Security and Jill Sanborn of the FBI, all officials who oversee aspects of intelligence and security operations.

Lawmakers have grilled law enforcement officials about missed intelligence ahead of the attack, including a report from an FBI field office in Virginia that warned of online posts foreshadowing a “war” in Washington. Capitol Police leaders have said they were unaware of the report at the time, even though the FBI had forwarded it to the department.

Testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, FBI Director Christopher Wray said the report was disseminated though the FBI’s joint terrorism task force, discussed at a command post in Washington and posted on an internet portal available to other law enforcement agencies.

Though the information was raw and unverified and appeared aspirational in nature, Wray said, it was specific and concerning enough that “the smartest thing to do, the most prudent thing to do, was just push it to the people who needed to get it.”

“We did communicate that information in a timely fashion to the Capitol Police and (Metropolitan Police Department) in not one, not two, but three different ways,” Wray said, though he added that since the violence that ensued was “not an acceptable result,” the FBI was looking into what it could have done differently.

  • Associated Categories: U.S. News, Associated Press (AP), AP National News, AP Online National News, Top U.S. News short headlines, Top General short headlines, AP Online Headlines - Washington, AP Online Congress News
© Copyright 2021 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
House prepares to pass landmark voting rights, ethics bill
House Democrats are poised to pass a sweeping elections and ethics bill, offering it up as a powerful counterweight to voting rights restrictions advancing in Republican-controlled statehouses
12:29AM ( 46 minutes ago )
Twins newcomer Happ back on mound after positive virus test
Eager for a fresh start with a new team, J
12:19AM ( 57 minutes ago )
Biden's Cabinet half-empty after slow start in confirmations
President Joe Biden’s Cabinet is taking shape at the slowest pace of any in modern history, with just over a dozen nominees for top posts confirmed more than a month into his tenure
12:15AM ( 1 hour ago )
Associated Press (AP)
Biden brings no relief to tensions between US and China
President Joe Biden took office promising to move quickly to restore and repair America’s relations with the rest of the world
12:06AM ( 1 hour ago )
US infrastructure gets C- from engineers as roads stagnate
America’s infrastructure has scored near-failing grades for its deteriorating roads, public transit and storm water systems due to years of inaction from the federal government
12:03AM ( 1 hour ago )
Ex-NFL player Kellen Winslow II faces sentencing for rapes
Former NFL player Kellen Winslow II could face more than a decade in prison for multiple rapes and other sexual offenses against five women in Southern California, including one who was homeless when he attacked her in 2018
12:03AM ( 1 hour ago )
AP National News
Budget nominee Tanden withdraws nomination amid opposition
President Joe Biden’s pick to head the Office of Management and Budget, Neera Tanden, has withdrawn her nomination after she faced opposition from key Democratic and Republican senators for her controversial tweets
10:03PM ( 3 hours ago )
Texas becomes biggest US state to lift COVID-19 mask mandate
Texas is lifting a COVID-19 mask mandate that was imposed last summer but has only been lightly enforced
9:58PM ( 3 hours ago )
Fauci presents his personal virus model to Smithsonian
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the immunologist who became the face of the U.S. government’s pandemic response, has donated his personal 3D model of the COVID-19 virus to the Smithsonian’s Museum of American History
9:00PM ( 4 hours ago )
AP Online National News
Unusual alliance seeks policing reforms in New Mexico
Policing reforms are making for strange bedfellows in New Mexico as the co-founders of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and the conservative-backed nonprofit group Americans for Prosperity lobby for a bill to eliminate police immunity from lawsuits on civil rights violations
10:12PM ( 3 hours ago )
Unusual alliance pushes seeks policing reforms in New Mexico
Policing reforms are making for strange bedfellows in New Mexico as the co-founders of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and the conservative-backed nonprofit group Americans for Prosperity lobby for a bill to eliminate police immunity from lawsuits on civil rights violations
9:10PM ( 4 hours ago )
Senate confirms Raimondo as Biden commerce secretary
The Senate has voted overwhelmingly to confirm Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo to serve as President Joe Biden’s commerce secretary and help guide the economy’s recovery during and after the coronavirus pandemic
8:36PM ( 4 hours ago )
AP Online Headlines - Washington
Senate votes to confirm Biden pick as commerce secretary
The Senate has voted overwhelmingly to confirm Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo to serve as President Joe Biden’s commerce secretary and help guide the economy’s recovery during and after the coronavirus pandemic
3:14PM ( 10 hours ago )
75 ex-top prosecutors endorse Biden’s pick for associate AG
More than 75 former U.S. attorneys are throwing their support behind President Joe Biden’s nominee for associate attorney general and urging congressional leaders to quickly confirm her to the post
3:11PM ( 10 hours ago )
Supreme Court likely to uphold Arizona voting restrictions
The Supreme Court appears ready to uphold voting restrictions in Arizona in a key case that could make it harder to challenge a raft of other voting measures Republicans have proposed following last year’s elections
2:11PM ( 11 hours ago )
AP Online Congress News
House prepares to pass landmark voting rights, ethics bill
House Democrats are poised to pass a sweeping elections and ethics bill, offering it up as a powerful counterweight to voting rights restrictions advancing in Republican-controlled statehouses
12:29AM ( 47 minutes ago )
Twins newcomer Happ back on mound after positive virus test
Eager for a fresh start with a new team, J
12:19AM ( 57 minutes ago )
Biden's Cabinet half-empty after slow start in confirmations
President Joe Biden’s Cabinet is taking shape at the slowest pace of any in modern history, with just over a dozen nominees for top posts confirmed more than a month into his tenure
12:15AM ( 1 hour ago )
Biden urges Senate Dems to rally behind $1.9T virus bill
President Joe Biden is urging Senate Democrats to rally behind a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill
12:14AM ( 1 hour ago )
Biden vows enough vaccine for all US adults by end of May
President Joe Biden says the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccine for all adults by the end of May — two months earlier than anticipated
12:12AM ( 1 hour ago )