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Monday May 17th, 2021 10:32PM

25 asylum-seekers who were waiting in Mexico released in US

By The Associated Press
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SAN DIEGO (AP) — The U.S. government on Friday released 25 asylum-seekers into the country with notices to appear in court, ending their long waits in Mexico and marking a milestone in unraveling a key immigration policy of former President Donald Trump.

The asylum-seekers tested negative for COVID-19 in Mexico and were taken to San Diego hotels to quarantine before they take a plane or bus to their final destinations in the U.S., said Michael Hopkins, chief executive officer of Jewish Family Service of San Diego, which is playing a critical support role.

Hopkins said the U.S. is expected to release 25 people a day in San Diego who were enrolled in Trump's “Remain in Mexico” program, which forced people seeking protection in the U.S. to wait south of the border until their court hearings. Authorities can process up to 300 asylum-seekers a day at the San Diego border crossing, but Hopkins said it's not known when they will change the target of 25 a day.

People also are expected to be let into the country starting Monday in Brownsville, Texas, and next Friday in El Paso, Texas.

Jewish Family Service, operating under a coalition of nongovernmental groups called the San Diego Rapid Response Network, will provide hotel rooms, arrange transportation and perform health screenings, Hopkins said. Jewish Family Service will buy bus or plane tickets if asylum-seekers can't afford them and winter clothes if needed.

“We’ll make sure they are healthy and in good shape to travel,” Hopkins said in an interview.

Friday's arrivals are the first of an estimated 25,000 people with active cases in the Remain in Mexico program and several hundred who are appealing decisions. U.S. officials are warning people not to come to the U.S.-Mexico border and to register on a website that the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees is launching early next week.

While the arrivals begin to return the asylum system to the way it worked for decades, there are unanswered questions, including how Central Americans who returned home will get back to the U.S.-Mexico border. It's also unclear how long it will take to work through all the cases, with the oldest going first.

President Joe Biden is quickly making good on a campaign promise to end the policy known officially as “Migrant Protection Protocols,” which Trump said was critical to reversing a surge of asylum-seekers that peaked in 2019. The program exposed people to violence in Mexican border cities and made it extremely difficult for them to find lawyers and communicate with courts about their cases.

About 70,000 asylum-seekers were part of the program since it started in January 2019. Asylum-seekers whose cases were dismissed or denied are not eligible to return to the country, but U.S. officials have not ruled out some form of relief later.

The Biden administration, which stopped enrolling new arrivals on its first day, said last week that asylum-seekers with active cases would be released in the United States with notices to appear in immigration courts closest to their final destinations. It brought huge relief to those who are eligible, while U.S. and U.N. officials urged against a rush to the border.

Edwin Gomez, who said his wife and 14-year-old son were killed by gangs in El Salvador after he couldn't pay extortion fees from his auto repair shop, was eager to join his 15-year-old daughter in Austin, Texas. She already won asylum and is living with family.

“Who thought this day would come?” Gomez, 36, said Wednesday in Tijuana, Mexico, at a border crossing with San Diego. “I never thought it would happen.”

Across the border from Texas' Rio Grande Valley, Enda Marisol Rivera of El Salvador and her 10-year-old son have been braving below-freezing temperatures this week, snuggling under piles of donated blankets in their makeshift tent of tarps. Their propane gas stove froze, she said. Despite the added hardship from the Arctic blast that hit Texas and northern Mexico, Rivera was in good spirits and closely watching the news.

Rivera and her son are among about 1,000 migrants living in the tent camp in a sprawling park just south of the Rio Grande in the Mexican city of Matamoros. About 850 of them have applied for asylum and were told to wait in Mexico for their court dates. Many in the camp turned down offers this week to be transferred to city shelters, fearing they would lose their chance at being allowed into the United States if they didn't stay close to the border. Some have been waiting for more than two years.

Rivera was hopeful she would be allowed to come to the United States, where she could live with her sister in Los Angeles as her case wound through immigration court.

“We have faith in God that we will be allowed in," she said Wednesday. “We have already spent enough time here.”

Nongovernmental organizations will play crucial roles in arranging temporary shelter and transportation once asylum-seekers enter the U.S.

“This problem was years in the making, and they’re trying to find solutions, but they are dealing with things coming up in real time,” said Andrea Leiner, spokeswoman for Global Response Management, which has been providing medical care at the camp in Matamoros. “I do think we need to give a little patience and leeway to sort this out as the actors involved get the plans in place to start doing this in a safe and effective manner.”

But she said everyone is also on edge, especially asylum-seekers.

“People are incredibly hopeful that this is their chance to get across, but there also is a lot of anxiety and fear that somehow if they do the wrong thing and they’re not at the right place at the right time, they might miss out,” Leiner said.

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