clearn.png
Saturday December 4th, 2021 9:30PM

AP-NORC poll: Americans are split on Trump's impeachment

By The Associated Press
Related Articles
  Contact Editor

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of Americans say former President Donald Trump bears at least some blame for the Capitol insurrection, and about half say the Senate should vote to convict him at the end of his impeachment trial.

That’s according to a survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research that also finds many Republicans continue to believe — contrary to all evidence — that President Joe Biden’s election was illegitimate.

It's the latest sign that Trump's monthslong disinformation campaign could have long-lasting ramifications for Biden as he tries to govern a fractured country and underscores the deep partisan divides that will outlast Trump's presidency. But it also shows some degree of consensus, with even many Republicans saying that Trump was at least partially responsible for his supporters' deadly storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6 in a bid to overturn the results of the November election.

Nearly two-thirds of Americans believe that Trump bears at least a moderate amount of responsibility for the breach of the U.S. Capitol, including half who say he bears a great deal or quite a bit. Just over a third say he bears little to no responsibility.

Most Republicans absolve him of guilt, but about 3 in 10 think he bears at least a moderate amount of blame for the events.

Fewer Americans, 47%, believe the Senate should vote to convict Trump after his impeachment trial, which begins next week. Another 40% say he should not be convicted, and 12% aren't sure. Trump last month became the first president in the nation's history to be impeached twice by the House, but it appears unlikely Democrats will have enough votes to convict him in the upper chamber.

Opinions on the trial fall along partisan lines, with more than 8 in 10 Democrats saying the Senate should convict, versus only about 1 in 10 Republicans. While those who believe he bears a large amount of responsibility generally believe he should be convicted, among those who say he is only moderately responsible, significantly more say the Senate should vote against than for conviction, 54% to 19%.

“I think it’s kind of ridiculous. Are we going to start impeaching all the past presidents we don’t like?” said Bill Stokes, 67, who lives in Casper, Wyoming, and voted for Trump in November, describing him as the “lesser of evils."

While Stokes allowed that Trump “perhaps” bore some responsibility for the events of Jan. 6, he said, “I don’t think it warrants impeachment. Maybe a censure, if that.”

“I really don’t feel like he incited a riot. He asked them to go down there for a peaceful protest. Maybe he didn’t understand mob psychology, but I think his responsibility there — they’re trying to put more on him than there really is," he said.

In interviews, other Republican respondents faulted Trump for egging on the crowd — and some felt he should be held accountable in some way — but didn’t think impeachment was the answer given that Trump has already left office and, they said, was unlikely to ever be elected again.

At the same time, the poll finds that many Republicans agree with the idea, championed by those who stormed the Capitol, that Biden’s election was illegitimate. Overall, 66% of Americans say Biden was legitimately elected president, but 65% of Republicans say he was not.

They include Dolores Mejia, 71, who lives in Peoria, Arizona, and maintains that, had all the votes been counted, “I think Trump would have won, I really believe that.”

A lifelong Democrat who switched her party registration to vote for Trump in November, Mejia cited everything from debunked conspiracies to friends' accounts to explain her reservations.

“I don’t care what the Democrats say. They stole the election. There's just no way, with the amount of support we were seeing, watching the rallies on TV, things like Truckers for Trump ... there is no way they did not steal the election," she contended.

Others were more ambivalent. Mark Richardson, a Republican who lives in High Point, North Carolina, and voted for Trump twice, said he understood why measures had been taken to allow for mail-in voting during the coronavirus pandemic but argued they should never be used again.

“It leaves too much room for questions,” he said. But Richardson, 39, who works in the electric vehicle industry, said the question of “legitimacy” is more nuanced.

“So I guess it depends on how you frame the question," he said. “Do I think every vote he received was legitimate? No. But do I think he's the president, legitimately? Yes.”

“Joe Biden's the president,” he said. "And that’s a-OK with me.”

GOP officials in several battleground states that Biden carried, including Arizona and Georgia, have said the election was fair. Trump’s claims were roundly rejected in the courts, including by judges appointed by Trump and by his former attorney general, William Barr.

In general, the poll shows that Americans have a more negative than positive view of Trump’s presidency and its impact on the country, but opposition is limited among Republicans. Only 36% of Americans overall say Trump was a great or even a good president, while 50% say he was a poor or terrible one.

By contrast, in late 2016, as Barack Obama was leaving office, 52% of Americans called him a good or great president, while 28% said he was poor or terrible.

While most Republicans say Trump was a good or great president, 15% call him just average and 11% say he was a poor or terrible president.

Americans are more mixed about how the Trump years impacted them personally. In fact, more call themselves better off than worse off than they were when Trump took office, by a margin of 38% to 27%.

___

The AP-NORC poll of 1,055 adults was conducted Jan. 28-Feb. 1 using a sample drawn from NORC’s probability-based AmeriSpeak Panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 3.8 percentage points.

___

Online:

AP-NORC Center: http://www.apnorc.org/.

  • Associated Categories: U.S. News, Associated Press (AP), AP National News, AP Online National News, Top U.S. News short headlines, Top General short headlines, AP Online Headlines - Washington, AP Online Congress News
© Copyright 2021 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
AP-NORC poll: Americans are split on Trump's impeachment
About half of Americans say the Senate should vote to convict former President Donald Trump at the end of his impeachment trial
8:00AM ( 4 minutes ago )
Senate approves budget bill as Harris casts tie-breaker vote
The Senate has approved a budget bill that's a key step toward fast-track passage of President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief plan without support from Republicans
7:38AM ( 25 minutes ago )
UN chief reappoints billionaire Bloomberg as climate envoy
The United Nations says American billionaire Michael Bloomberg has been reappointed as a special envoy to engage governments and businesses in tackling the threat of global warming
7:26AM ( 38 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
EXPLAINER: What US ending Saudi war support means for Yemen
President Joe Biden’s announcement that the U.S. will end its support of a Saudi-led coalition’s yearslong war against Yemen’s Houthi rebels likely will increase pressure on the kingdom to end its campaign there
6:12AM ( 1 hour ago )
Super Bowl ads aim to comfort and connect
Super Bowl ads each year offer a snapshot of the American psyche _ and this year it’s a doozy
6:00AM ( 2 hours ago )
Fiercely divided House kicks Greene off both her committees
A fiercely divided House has tossed Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene off both her committees
5:16AM ( 2 hours ago )
AP National News
Trump rejects Dems' request to testify at impeachment trial
Former President Donald Trump is rejecting a request by House Democrats to testify under oath for his Senate impeachment trial
12:36AM ( 7 hours ago )
'Hug tent' provides safe embraces at Colorado elderly home
Residents at an assisted living center near Denver are getting a taste of what life was like before the coronavirus pandemic
12:09AM ( 7 hours ago )
Jeffrey Epstein fund abruptly halts payouts to victims
A fund set up to provide money to victims of financier Jeffrey Epstein has abruptly suspended payouts
12:08AM ( 7 hours ago )
Top U.S. News short headlines
The Latest: Germany to receive 1st AstraZeneca vaccine
Germany’s health minister says first batches of the newly authorized AstraZeneca vaccine for will be delivered to the country’s 16 states Friday
5:01AM ( 3 hours ago )
The Latest: Hungary says Sputnik V ready for use next week
Hungary could be the first country in the European Union to administer a Russian COVID-19 vaccine as early as next week
4:55AM ( 3 hours ago )
The Latest: UK arrivals to spend 10 days in hotel isolation
British officials say everyone arriving in the country from coronavirus hot spots will have to spend 10 days in hotel quarantine starting Feb. 15 in a bid to stop new variants of the virus reaching the U.K. The government is facing criticism for the delay in implementing the policy, which it first announced in late January
4:48AM ( 3 hours ago )
AP Online Headlines - Washington
The Latest: Mexico's president has negative antigen test
 Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has posted a video saying he had tested negative on an antigen test, after testing positive for COVID-19 about 12 days ago
12:05AM ( 7 hours ago )
Resistance to coup grows despite Myanmar's block of Facebook
Myanmar’s new military government has blocked access to Facebook as resistance to Monday's coup surges amid calls for civil disobedience to protest the ousting of the elected government and its leader, Aung San Suu Kyi
10:01PM ( 10 hours ago )
Banning pets from bill hearings? All in favor say meow.
Politically active pets are out of luck in New Hampshire, where some lawmakers have been told to keep their cats and dogs out of the room when they log on for remote hearings
9:16PM ( 10 hours ago )
AP Online Congress News
Senate approves budget bill as Harris casts tie-breaker vote
The Senate has approved a budget bill that's a key step toward fast-track passage of President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief plan without support from Republicans
7:38AM ( 25 minutes ago )
UN chief reappoints billionaire Bloomberg as climate envoy
The United Nations says American billionaire Michael Bloomberg has been reappointed as a special envoy to engage governments and businesses in tackling the threat of global warming
7:26AM ( 38 minutes ago )
The Latest: UK regulator backs benefits of COVID-19 vaccines
Britain’s drug regulator says the coronavirus vaccines being used across the country appear safe and that “the benefits continue to far outweigh any risks,” according to its latest monitoring data
7:23AM ( 41 minutes ago )
Global shares rise amid hopes for global economic rebound
Global shares are rising ahead of the latest U.S. monthly jobs report as hopes grow for a gradual global economic recovery from the damage of the coronavirus pandemic
7:17AM ( 47 minutes ago )
UK to start hotel quarantine Feb. 15 amid criticism of delay
Everyone arriving in the U.K. from countries identified as coronavirus hotspots will have to spend 10 days in hotel quarantine starting Feb. 15 in a bid to stop new virus variants reaching the country
6:55AM ( 1 hour ago )