sunny.png
Thursday April 15th, 2021 8:26PM

Money for $300 unemployment boost to run out after 6 weeks

By The Associated Press
Related Articles
  Contact Editor

The temporary $300-a-week unemployment insurance boost implemented by President Donald Trump is about to end, with no extension in sight.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency said Thursday in an email to The Associated Press that it has distributed $30 billion of the $44 billion it had set aside for the benefit. The agency said the fund was enough to cover six weeks of additional jobless aid starting Aug. 1, so unemployed workers won't receive any more after this week.

FEMA emphasized that all eligible recipients will get the $300 boost to cover six weeks, a period that ended Sept. 5.

Some states had technical obstacles that have delayed the payments, and the federal government is still in the process of approving other states' plans to distribute the money. Eligible workers who have not yet received the $300-a-week supplement or have received less than six weeks' worth, will receive payments for their full share, according to FEMA. After that, the fund will be dry.

The program was designed to leave money to deal with natural disasters, such as the wildfires now sweeping the West, even after the unemployment boost was gone.

Trump created the program after a more generous $600-a-week benefit adopted by Congress expired. The federal government initially did not have an estimate of how long the money would last, but six weeks is in line with what experts expected.

The Trump administration and congressional Republicans and Democrats have been unable to agree on a new coronavirus relief package that would include an extension of the unemployment supplement.

Recipients have said the extra jolt of money from the federal government kept them afloat as the economy cratered amid stay-at-home orders and business closings. On Thursday, the government reported that 13.4 million Americans continue to receive state unemployment benefits, although not all of them are receiving the additional $300.

The extra weekly payments came with a significant string attached: It was available only to people receiving at least $100 a week in other unemployment insurance benefits. That cut out hundreds of thousands of low-wage earners, people who had jobs for short periods and gig workers.

One of them is Philip Tuley of Clearlake Oaks, California.

His unemployment benefits come to $65 a week, or $260 a month. It was so low because Tuley, 63, had previously taken a year off after spending two decades as an assistant educator at a school district in rural Northern California. He had been substituting recently and was about to return to his district full time when the pandemic struck.

His unemployment benefit was so small because it was based on his average earnings over a two-year period. He said he’s been turned away from a local food bank because its shelves were bare.

Tuley said Trump’s order is to blame for the predicament he and other low-wage workers are in.

"To have him choose that people who didn’t get $100 were excluded, that’s just -- forgive me — it seems sheer evil,” Tuley said.

A handful of states kicked in an additional $100 per person to enhance the payment. South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, a Republican, was the lone governor to decline the additional weekly benefit, according to an AP tally of the states.

FEMA’s announcement came as Democrats in the U.S. Senate scuttled a scaled-back GOP coronavirus aid plan, arguing that it was too stingy. That bill includes continuing a $300 weekly unemployment supplement until late December.

Paula Ridenti, 33, who lives in Waltham, Massachusetts, gets $202 a week in regular unemployment benefits since she stopped working at a grocery store in March when her children's schools closed, so the $600 supplement was a major help.

But she’s still waiting for her checks with the $300 boost. She should get that money eventually, but in the meantime she has been trying to figure out how to make do on an income that adds up to just about half her monthly $1,600 rent.

“I feel like the two political parties should get together and put aside their differences for the sake of saving their country,” she said.

  • Associated Categories: U.S. News, Associated Press (AP), AP National News, Top U.S. News short headlines, AP Online Headlines - Washington, AP Online Congress News, AP Business, AP Business - Economy
© Copyright 2021 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
SC's Graham says he orchestrated Trump-Woodward interviews
Sen. Lindsey Graham, one of President Donald Trump’s top congressional allies, is denouncing an implication floated by a Fox News personality that he intended to sabotage the president by setting up a series of revelatory interviews with journalist Bob Woodward
3:36PM ( 15 minutes ago )
Dem report: Medicare chief used fed money to bolster image
A report by congressional Democrats says private consultants to the federal official who oversees Medicare billed taxpayers almost $6 million in less than two years largely to burnish her personal image
3:30PM ( 20 minutes ago )
Taliban say peace talks with Afghan team to start Saturday
The Taliban say the long-awaited peace talks with the negotiating team selected by the Afghan government are to begin on Saturday in the Gulf Arab state of Qatar
3:20PM ( 30 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
US charges Russian with plot to create election distrust
The Trump administration has charged a Russian national in a sweeping plot to create distrust in the American political process
2:43PM ( 1 hour ago )
Trump heads to Michigan amid Woodward book fallout
President Donald Trump was trying to move past revelations that he was determined to play down the threat of the coronavirus as he headed for a rally in battleground Michigan Thursday
2:31PM ( 1 hour ago )
Wisconsin Democrats think they can avoid mistakes of 2016
Wisconsin Democrats are confident the lessons they learned when President Donald Trump won four years ago will ensure he doesn’t do it again
2:29PM ( 1 hour ago )
AP Online Headlines - Washington
Despite judge's order, plans being made for census layoffs
Even though a federal judge ordered the U.S. Census Bureau to halt winding down the 2020 census for the time being, supervisors in at least one California office have been instructed to make plans for laying off census takers
11:56AM ( 3 hours ago )
GOP's slimmed-down virus bill expected to fail in Senate
A scaled-back GOP coronavirus rescue package appears certain to fail in a Senate test vote
11:01AM ( 4 hours ago )
US layoffs remain elevated as job market's gains weaken
The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits was unchanged last week at 884,000, a sign that layoffs remain stuck at a historically high level six months after the viral pandemic flattened the economy
9:58AM ( 5 hours ago )
AP Online Congress News
US stocks swing from gains to losses as wild week continues
Stocks are moving broadly lower on Wall Street Thursday, as losses in technology and energy companies cut into some of the market’s solid gains from a day earlier
2:44PM ( 1 hour ago )
European Central Bank expects to use full extent of stimulus
The European Central Bank has left its key stimulus policies unchanged with plenty still in the pipeline to bolster the eurozone economy’s rebound from the severe coronavirus shutdowns
2:32PM ( 1 hour ago )
Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank
Citigroup’s Jane Fraser will become the first woman ever to lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February
2:23PM ( 1 hour ago )
AP Business
US long-term mortgage rates fall; 30-year at 2.86%
U.S. average rates on long-term mortgages fell this week amid signs that the halting economic recovery slowed over the summer
11:36AM ( 4 hours ago )
AP Explains: What's driving India-China military standoff
India and China are accusing each other of violating agreements along their disputed mountain border, even as they engage in talks to end increasing military tensions
11:06AM ( 4 hours ago )
The Latest: UN leader appeals for $35B for WHO initiatives
The Secretary-General of the United Nations appealed to donor countries and others to pitch in $35 billion for a World Health Organization-led initiative that aims to speed the research and development of tests, treatments and vaccines for the coronavirus
10:58AM ( 4 hours ago )
AP Business - Economy
SC's Graham says he orchestrated Trump-Woodward interviews
Sen. Lindsey Graham, one of President Donald Trump’s top congressional allies, is denouncing an implication floated by a Fox News personality that he intended to sabotage the president by setting up a series of revelatory interviews with journalist Bob Woodward
3:36PM ( 15 minutes ago )
Dem report: Medicare chief used fed money to bolster image
A report by congressional Democrats says private consultants to the federal official who oversees Medicare billed taxpayers almost $6 million in less than two years largely to burnish her personal image
3:30PM ( 21 minutes ago )
Taliban say peace talks with Afghan team to start Saturday
The Taliban say the long-awaited peace talks with the negotiating team selected by the Afghan government are to begin on Saturday in the Gulf Arab state of Qatar
3:20PM ( 31 minutes ago )
The Latest: Louisiana to ease some coronavirus restrictions
Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards says he’ll ease public gathering restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of coronavirus
3:16PM ( 34 minutes ago )
Russian, Ukrainian lawmaker accused of election interference
The Trump administration has charged a Russian national in a sweeping plot to sow distrust in the American political process, And the government is imposing sanctions against a Ukrainian lawmaker accused of interfering in the U.S. presidential election in November
3:16PM ( 35 minutes ago )