sunny.png
Monday September 23rd, 2019 4:12PM

Facebook US data transfer case goes to Europe's top court

By The Associated Press
Related Articles
  Contact Editor

LONDON (AP) — An Austrian privacy campaigner's long-running legal battle against Facebook over its data transfers to the U.S. reached the European Union's highest court on Tuesday.

The European Court of Justice was hearing arguments on whether Facebook's Dublin-based subsidiary can legally transfer users' personal data to the U.S. parent company.

A decision, which is expected by the end of the year, could have far-reaching implications for social media companies and thousands of EU businesses that send customer data to places like the U.S.

Privacy campaigner Max Schrems launched the case in 2013 after former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed the extent of electronic surveillance by U.S. security agencies, including the disclosure that Facebook gave the agencies access to the personal data of Europeans.

Schrems, concerned that his personal information was at risk, had challenged the data transfers through the courts in Ireland, where Facebook's European business is headquartered.

The Irish Data Commissioner issued a preliminary decision that the transfers may be illegal because so-called "standard contractual clauses" that govern data transfers don't adequately protect consumers' data privacy. The clauses are data protection agreements approved by the EU's executive Commission in which businesses commit to abiding by the bloc's stringent privacy standards, including protecting personal data.

The Irish authorities eventually asked the ECJ, which is based in Luxembourg and is the EU's top court, for a ruling on whether these contractual clauses comply with European rules.

Schrems doesn't have a problem with the agreements per se but said the commissioner can, under the law, take a more measured approach by halting data transfers in individual cases, like Facebook's.

Facebook said the agreements are vital tools for companies.

"Standard Contractual Clauses provide important safeguards to ensure that Europeans' data are protected once transferred overseas," the social network's associate general counsel, Jack Gilbert, said in a statement. They "enable thousands of Europeans to do business worldwide."

  • Associated Categories: Associated Press (AP), AP World News, AP Business, AP Business - Consumer News, AP Technology News
© Copyright 2019 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
Facebook US data transfer case goes to Europe's top court
Legal battle between Austrian privacy campaigner, Facebook over data transfers goes to Europe's top court
6:27AM ( 12 minutes ago )
PepsiCo continues to impress, tops 2Q forecasts
PepsiCo continues to churn out better profits under a new CEO
6:25AM ( 14 minutes ago )
23 US governors join Calif. in opposing Trump mileage freeze
Citing climate-damaging tailpipe emissions, 23 US governors sign a pledge backing California leaders in their showdown with the Trump administration over its plans to relax vehicle mileage standards
6:00AM ( 39 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
What did Epstein's famous friends know and see?
Arrest of Jeffrey Epstein raises new questions about how much his high-powered associates knew about the hedge fund manager's interactions with underage girls
4:09AM ( 2 hours ago )
Japan says it won't talk or retract export rules on S. Korea
Japan said it did not plan to retract or negotiate its tightened controls on high-tech exports to South Korea, where the president has urged diplomacy
3:20AM ( 3 hours ago )
Asian shares mostly retreat ahead of Fed statement
Asian shares are mostly lower in quiet trading as investors await signs of what might be ahead for U.S. interest rates
2:53AM ( 3 hours ago )
AP Business
Activists worry about potential abuse of face scans for ICE
Civil rights activists are complaining about the potential for abuse following confirmation that at least three states have scanned millions of driver's license photos on behalf of Immigration and Customs Enforcement
4:15AM ( 2 hours ago )
Heather Mills gets UK phone hacking apology, payout
Heather Mills and her sister have received an apology and a settlement from the defunct News of the World tabloid over the hacking of their phones
7:05AM ( 23 hours ago )
Mystery of NSA leak lingers as stolen document case winds up
A high-profile raid at the home of a National Security Agency contractor seemed to be linked to the devastating leak of U.S. government hacking tools, but three years later, with the case close to being resolved, whoever was behind the leak is a mystery
4:59PM ( 2 days ago )
AP Technology News
PepsiCo continues to impress, tops 2Q forecasts
PepsiCo continues to churn out better profits under a new CEO
6:25AM ( 14 minutes ago )
23 US governors join Calif. in opposing Trump mileage freeze
Citing climate-damaging tailpipe emissions, 23 US governors sign a pledge backing California leaders in their showdown with the Trump administration over its plans to relax vehicle mileage standards
6:00AM ( 39 minutes ago )
The Latest: 2017 Wimbledon champ Muguruza splits with coach
Garbiñe Muguruza, the 2017 Wimbledon champion, has split with her coach of about four years, Sam Sumyk
5:57AM ( 42 minutes ago )
1 Justice Department, 2 views on sex charges against Epstein
There is only one Justice Department, but two of its largest U.S. attorneys' offices came to vastly different conclusions about what to do with convicted sex offender and wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein over his abuse of underage girls
5:30AM ( 1 hour ago )
Japan says it won't discuss or retract SKorea export rules
Japan rebuffs call for negotiations over tightened controls on exports to South Korea
5:25AM ( 1 hour ago )