Monday July 6th, 2020 4:35AM

Migrants anxious after Mexican authorities raid caravan

By The Associated Press
Related Articles
  Contact Editor

PIJIJIAPAN, Mexico (AP) — Central American migrants hoping to reach the U.S. are finding a much tougher trek than those in previous caravans, meeting unwelcoming townsfolk and a surprise raid by Mexican police and immigration agents who detained hundreds in Mexico's south.

While their compatriots were been taken into custody Monday, hundreds of other migrants scrambled away into the brush along the highway in Chiapas state to elude authorities.

Many had already learned they would not be received in towns with the same hospitality that greeted previous caravans, and now they know they won't be safe walking along the rural highway either. Mexican authorities say they detained 367 people in the largest single raid on a migrant caravan since the groups started moving through the country last year.

Oscar Johnson Rivas fled up a mountain when officers converged on the caravan and spent six hours hiding in the thick vegetation before carefully making his way back to the highway with others. Some migrants, including women and children, remained in hiding without food.

"What we did was find the bush and get as far away as we could so they couldn't grab us," said Rivas, a 45-year-old soldier from El Salvador who said he had to flee his country because of gang threats.

"They were grabbing us mercilessly, like we were animals," he said of the Mexican officials. "That's a barbarity, because we're all human."

Mexico's National Migration Institute issued a statement saying agents were carrying out an immigration check on a group of migrants who "began an aggression" against the agents, who then called in federal police.

It said 367 people, including a "significant number" of children and women, were "rescued" and taken to an immigration station.

Journalists saw police target isolated groups at the tail end of a caravan of about 3,000 migrants who were making their way through Chiapas, Mexico's southernmost state.

As migrants gathered under spots of shade in the burning heat outside the city of Pijijiapan, federal police and agents arrived in patrol trucks and vans and forcibly wrestled women, men and children into the vehicles.

The migrants were driven to buses, presumably for subsequent transportation to an immigration station for deportation processing.

Some women and children wailed and screamed during the detentions on the roadside. Clothes, shoes, suitcases and strollers littered the scene after they were taken away.

Agents had encouraged groups of migrants that separated from the bulk of the caravan to rest after some seven hours of trudging along the road, including about half of that under a broiling sun. When the migrants regrouped to continue, they were detained.

Agents positioned themselves at the head of the group and at the back. Some people in civilian clothing appeared to be participating in the detentions.

After seeing others being detained, some migrants began walking in dense groups and picked up stones and sticks.

Officials from Mexico's National Human Rights Commission observed the action from a distance.

Mexico welcomed the first migrant caravans last year, but the reception has gotten colder since tens of thousands of migrants overwhelmed U.S. border crossings, causing delays at the border and angering Mexican residents.

The U.S. also has ramped up pressure on Mexico to do more to stem the flow of migrants. President Donald Trump railed against the government of his Mexican counterpart, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, and threatened to shut the entire border down, but then quickly congratulated Mexico for migrant arrests just a few weeks ago.

Mexico already allows the United States to return some asylum seekers to Mexico as their cases play out. And government officials said in March they would try to contain migrants in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in the south. It is Mexico's narrowest area and the easiest to control. Pijijiapan and Mapastepec are not far from the isthmus' narrowest point, which is in neighboring Oaxaca state.

In recent months Mexican authorities have deported thousands of migrants, though they also have issued more than 15,000 humanitarian visas that allow migrants to remain in the country and work.

A group of about 10 prominent social organizations recently warned that detentions of migrants have been rising and accused immigration agents and federal, state and local police of violating their human rights.

The groups said the increased detentions have overwhelmed capacity at the immigration center in Tapachula. The National Human Rights Commission also said the facility is overcrowded.

In its most recent statement from last week, the Migration Institute said 5,336 migrants were in shelters or immigration centers in Chiapas, and over 1,500 of them were "awaiting deportation."

The Rights Commission said Sunday that more than 7,500 migrants were in detention, at shelters or on the road in Chiapas. It urged authorities to carry out a proper census of the migrants and attend to their needs, particularly children.

  • Associated Categories: Associated Press (AP), AP National News, AP Online National News, Top General short headlines, AP World News
© Copyright 2020 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
Sri Lanka arrests 40 suspects after bombings, toll up to 310
Police arrest 40 suspects as emergency takes effect giving the military war-time powers; death toll of Easter bombings rises to 310
12:04AM ( 5 minutes ago )
Migrants anxious after Mexican authorities raid caravan
Central American migrants hoping to reach the U.S. now carry the added anxiety of the pursued after Mexican authorities detained hundreds in a surprise raid on a caravan in Mexico's south
12:02AM ( 7 minutes ago )
Harris joins impeachment call during Democratic town hall
Kamala Harris joins call for impeachment during 2020 Democratic town halls
11:56PM ( 13 minutes ago )
Associated Press (AP)
Sri Lanka, like world, again sees scourge of suicide bombing
The Easter attacks in Sri Lanka are a bloody echo of decades past in the island nation, when militants inspired by attacks in the Lebanese civil war helped develop the suicide bomb vest
11:20PM ( 49 minutes ago )
Harris joins call for impeachment during 2020 Dem town halls
Harris joins call for impeachment during 2020 Dem town halls
10:49PM ( 1 hour ago )
Quake kills at least 11, 24 missing in northern Philippines
Rescuers found more bodies in the rubble of a supermarket that crashed down in a powerful earthquake that damaged buildings and an airport in the northern Philippines, raising the death toll to 11
10:41PM ( 1 hour ago )
AP National News
AP FACT CHECK: Mueller interviewed many close to president
AP FACT CHECK: President Donald Trump is falsely suggesting that the people closest to him weren't interviewed by special counsel Robert Mueller and his team
8:40PM ( 3 hours ago )
Tesla CEO plans to hand the car keys to robots next year
Tesla CEO Elon Musk foresees company's electric cars turning the controls over to robots beginning next year
8:18PM ( 3 hours ago )
Fight for 2020 Democratic nomination moves to prime time
Fight for 2020 Democratic nomination moves to prime time
8:04PM ( 4 hours ago )
AP Online National News
Sri Lanka arrests 40 suspects after bombings, toll up to 310
Police arrest 40 suspects as emergency takes effect giving the military war-time powers; death toll of Easter bombings rises to 310
12:04AM ( 5 minutes ago )
Harris joins impeachment call during Democratic town hall
Kamala Harris joins call for impeachment during 2020 Democratic town halls
11:56PM ( 13 minutes ago )
The Latest: Buttigieg doesn't think prisoners should vote
Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg says he doesn't believe convicted criminals in prison should be able to vote
11:38PM ( 31 minutes ago )
Harper angrily confronts ump, Phillies fall to Mets 5-1
Bryce Harper bolted from the bench to angrily confront the plate umpire after being ejected, and it took three members of the Philadelphia Phillies to hold back the enraged slugger in a 5-1 loss to the New York Mets
11:38PM ( 31 minutes ago )
North Korea's Kim to meet Putin at crucial diplomatic moment
North Korea confirms leader Kim Jong Un will soon visit Russia to meet with President Vladimir Putin in a summit that comes at a crucial moment for tenuous diplomacy meant to rid the North of its nuclear arsenal
11:37PM ( 32 minutes ago )