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Thursday July 16th, 2020 12:23PM

Mattis faces questions from allies on Islamic State strategy

By The Associated Press
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HELSINKI (AP) — As the Islamic State group loses its remaining strongholds in Iraq and Syria, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is facing a growing chorus of questions from NATO allies and partners about what the next steps will be in the region to preserve peace and ensure the militants don't rise again.

Heading into a week of meetings with Nordic countries and allies across Europe, Mattis must begin to articulate what has been a murky American policy on how the future of Syria unfolds.

Speaking to reporters traveling with him to Finland, Mattis said the main question from U.S. allies is: what comes next? And he said the key is to get the peace process on track.

"We're trying to get this into the diplomatic mode so we can get things sorted out," said Mattis, who will meet with NATO defense ministers later this week. "and make certain (that) minorities -- whoever they are -- are not just subject to more of what we've seen" under Syrian President Bashar Assad until now.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in late October repeated Washington's call for Assad to surrender control, looking past recent battlefield gains by his Russian-backed forces to insist that "the reign of the Assad family is coming to an end."

Tillerson made the comments after meeting with the U.N.'s envoy for Syria, Staffan de Mistura, who later announced plans to resume U.N.-mediated peace talks Nov. 28. It will be the eighth such round under his mediation in Geneva since early 2016.

Mattis said intelligence assessments two to three months ago made it clear that the Islamic State group was "going down." He said information based on the number of IS individuals taken prisoner and the number of fighters who were getting wounded or were deserting the group made it clear that "the whole bottom was dropping out."

But while he said the effort now is to get the diplomatic process shifted to Geneva and the United Nations, he offered few details that suggest the effort is moving forward.

In addition to the diplomatic efforts, Mattis said the U.S. is still working to resolve conflicts with Russia in the increasingly crowded skies over the Iraq and Syria border, where a lot of the fighting has shifted.

On Friday, Assad's military announced the capture of the eastern Syrian city of Deir el-Zour, while Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi proclaimed victory in retaking the town of Qaim on the border, the militants' last significant urban area in Iraq.

Focus has now turned to Boukamal, the last urban center for the militants in both Iraq and Syria where Syrian troops —backed by Russia and Iranian-supported militias — and U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces are vying for control of the strategic border town.

The proximity of forces in the area has raised concerns about potential clashes between them as they approach Boukamal from opposite sides of the Euphrates River, and now from across the border with Iraq.

Mattis said that as forces close in, the fighting is getting "much more complex," and there is a lot of effort on settling air space issues with the Russians.

He also declined to say whether the U.S. will begin to take back weapons provided to Syrian Kurdish fighters, known as the YPG. The U.S. has argued that the YPG has been the most effective fighting group in the battle to oust IS from Raqqa, but Turkey opposed the arming effort because it believes the YPG is linked to a militant group in Turkey.

The U.S. has pledged to carefully monitor the weapons, to insure that they don't make their way to the hands of insurgents in Turkey, known as the PKK. The U.S. also considers the PKK a terrorist organization, and has vowed it would never provide weapons to that group.

Turkish officials have said that Mattis reassured them by letter that arms given to the Syrian Kurds would be taken back and that the U.S. would provide Turkey with a regular list of arms given to the fighters.

While in Finland, Mattis will attend a meeting of a dozen northern European nations, which are primarily concerned about threats from Russia.

"They are focused on the north," said Mattis, adding that he plans to listen to their thoughts on the region and determine how the U.S. can help, including what types of training America could provide.

"It is an opportunity to reiterate where we stand by our friends," said Mattis, "if any nation including Russia seeks to undermine the rules of international order."

During a press briefing later on Monday, Denmark Defense Minister Claus Hjord Frederiksen told reporters that allies must continue to be present in the region because of the risk that IS would rise again.

"We're not so naive that we think that terrorism is removed from this earth, but of course it is very important to have taken geographical areas from them so they can't attack or rob or whatever — using the income from oil production to finance their activities," said Frederiksen. "We foresee therefore years ahead we will have to secure that they cannot gain new ground there."

____

Associated Press video journalist David Keyton contributed to this report.

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