clear
Tuesday August 4th, 2015 11:59AM

US Latinos optimistic amid challenges

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Latinos in America are generally optimistic about the future, despite still facing challenges such as discrimination and concerns over job security and personal finances, according to a report released Tuesday.

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health polled nearly 1,500 Latino Americans on topics including education, finances, religion, health and jobs. More than half, or 52 percent, stated no preference on being called "Latino" or "Hispanic."

About 44 percent of Latinos live in predominantly Hispanic communities, the report found. Latinos reported facing several challenges in their communities, with 16 percent experiencing crime and violence, and 10 percent reporting economic issues.

About 40 percent of Hispanics rated that the quality of available housing in their community is fair or poor. More than a third also rated as fair or poor the public transportation system (36 percent) and availability of recreational facilities for exercise and sports (36 percent). Nearly the same number, 34 percent, said safety from crime in their community was fair or poor.

Despite these concerns, the majority of Hispanics, 89 percent, said they are satisfied with their communities.

Discrimination remains a challenge, the report indicates. About a quarter, or 26 percent, said they have experienced discrimination in the past year and believe it was because they are Latino. About 1 in 10 Latinos said they believe they received poor health care within the past five years because of their ethnic background, or because they spoke with an accent. Among the Latinos who have received health care in the past year, 19 percent rated health care services as fair or poor.

Like most Americans, Hispanics also worry about job security and finances. About 45 percent of employed Latinos feared they or someone in their household will lose a job within the next year. More than a third, or 36 percent, say their personal finances are not so good or poor.

More than three-quarters of Hispanics, or 77 percent, think their children will have better educational opportunities than they did, and 83 percent think their children will have better employment opportunities. About 80 percent of Latinos think their children will be better off than they are when their children reach the age they are today. About 90 percent of Hispanics are satisfied with their lives overall.

The report compares Latino immigrants to American-born Latinos. Immigrants overall were more optimistic about their future than native-born. About 91 percent of Latino immigrants feel their children would have better educational opportunities than themselves compared to 68 percent of native-born Latinos.

Immigrants were more likely than native-born Latinos to have only a high school education or less, 74 percent compared to 49 percent. Employed immigrants were twice as likely as employed native-born Latinos to say they were concerned about themselves or someone in their household losing their job within the next year. They were also twice as likely to say they were not confident they had enough money or health insurance to pay for a major illness, with 67 percent compared to 34 percent.

The study also examined Latinos by dividing them according to heritage: Cubans, Dominicans, South Americans, Central Americans, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans. It found that Cubans were ahead of most other Latinos in many social economic indicators, including education and home ownership. Puerto Ricans were more likely to speak English than Spanish at home. Central Americans were the least educated among poll participants, with more than half having less than a high school education.

The study was compiled from interviews conducted in English and Spanish via telephone, landline and cell phone, by SSRS of Media from June 11 to July 14, 2013, among a nationally representative sample of 1,478 Latinos age 18 and older. The margin of error for total respondents is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points.
© Copyright 2015 AccessWDUN.com
All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.
Judge denies motions to move, delay Tsarnaev trial
Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev asked a federal appeals court Wednesday to overturn a judge's decision to not move his upcoming trial out of state.
10:02PM ( 7 months ago )
High court to adopt electronic filing of cases
The Supreme Court is belatedly developing an electronic filing system similar to those used in courts around the country, Chief Justice John Roberts said Wednesday in his annual end-of-year report.
7:57PM ( 7 months ago )
Storm brings snow, cold to West for New Year's
A blustery winter storm dumped snow and ice across the West on Wednesday, making driving treacherous in the mountains from California to the Rockies and forcing residents and party-goers in some usually sun-soaked cities to bundle up for a frosty New Year's.
5:19PM ( 7 months ago )
U.S. News
State DOT awards $48M contract for NE Ga. road project
The state Department of Transportation has awarded a $47.8 million contract for nine miles of work on a northeast Georgia road.
9:37AM ( 7 months ago )
Business News
Grass fire impacts rush hour traffic on 985
Rush hour traffic on I-985 was slowed by a grass fire Wednesay afternoon with one lane closed while firefighters fought the blaze.
10:19PM ( 7 months ago )
Hall County conviction, sentencing to be reviewed by SCOGA
The State Supreme Court has agreed to hear the appeal of a Hall County man when they reconvene in January.
2:37PM ( 7 months ago )
Maysville man dies from Banks County wreck
The Georgia State Patrol reports that alcohol and/or drugs were factors a single-vehicle wreck that claimed the life of a Maysville man in Banks County Tuesday night.
11:07AM ( 7 months ago )
Local/State News
GOP leader regrets talk to white supremacists; party leaders rally around him
House Republican leaders rallied around one of their own, Whip Steve Scalise, on Tuesday after he said he regrets speaking 12 years ago to a white supremacist organization and condemns the views of such groups.
6:08PM ( 7 months ago )
Conviction of Putin foe sets off protest in Moscow
President Vladimir Putin's chief political foe was convicted along with his brother on Tuesday in a fraud case widely seen as a vendetta by the Kremlin, triggering one of Russia's boldest anti-government demonstrations in years.
6:03PM ( 7 months ago )
More Georgians signing up for health insurance
A federal report says more Georgians have selected health insurance plans through a federally facilitated marketplace.
4:16PM ( 7 months ago )
Politics
More fights ahead on Planned Parenthood after Senate vote
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the aftermath of the Senate's derailing of Republican legislation halting federal dollars for Planned Parenthood, one thing seems clear: Many on both sides think they can ring up...
7:17AM ( 4 hours ago )
US auto sales strong in July on SUV, luxury demand
DETROIT (AP) — More Americans are buying cars that say "look at me."Luxury vehicles like Audis and Volvos drove off dealer lots at a furious pace in July and, combined with sizzling demand for SUVs, h...
4:14PM ( 19 hours ago )
Climate change: Obama orders steeper emissions cuts from power plants
Aiming to jolt the rest of the world to action, President Barack Obama moved ahead Sunday with even tougher greenhouse gas cuts on American power plants.
By The Associated Press
6:40PM ( 1 day ago )
Some Americans refuse to give up on Confederate flag
Many Americans assumed the Confederate flag was retired for good
By Associated Press
6:30PM ( 1 day ago )
Biden for President? Associates mulling Clinton challenge
Vice President Joe Biden's associates have resumed discussions about a 2016 presidential run after largely shelving such deliberations while his son was sick and dying earlier this year.
By The Associated Press
9:50AM ( 2 days ago )